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Monday, August 10
 

5:00pm

Check-in for Pre-registered Participants
Look for the FLEAT 6 table in the hotel lobby.

Moderators
EC

Eric Clopper

FLEAT Director of Logistics

Monday August 10, 2015 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Omni Parker House Hotel 60 School St, Boston, MA 02108
 
Tuesday, August 11
 

9:00am

Toolkit for Language Center Assessment
In this session, the IALLT Assessment Committee will present elements of the Language Center Assessment Toolkit they created over the course of the 2014-2015 academic year. The purpose of the toolkit is to provide institutions of higher education with a customizable set of tools to assist with the internal evaluation of their language centers.

The toolkit includes 1) a short paper on “Recommendations for Assembling an Evaluation Committee,” 2) a collaborative paper on what a language center is and how to evaluate it, 3) a center self-evaluation form, 4) a list of descriptors organized in categories (student services, resources, etc.), and 5) a set of surveys (for faculty, center staff, and student staff). The presenters will introduce the toolkit and present the self-evaluation form and descriptor list in detail. Throughout, the presenters will discuss the challenges they encountered when designing a toolkit that is useful and relevant when evaluating a wide variety of language centers. They will then ask the audience for feedback and suggestions on how to improve this toolkit.

Speakers
avatar for Felix Kronenberg

Felix Kronenberg

Associate Prof., Modern Languages & Director of the Language Learning Center, Rhodes College
avatar for Betsy Lavolette

Betsy Lavolette

Director, Language Resource Center, Gettysburg College
ES

Edwige Simon

The University of Colorado Boulder


Tuesday August 11, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
Lamont Library - Room 310 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138

9:00am

Thinking about Syncing? Tools for Designing and Assessing Listening and Speaking Tasks
Harnessing and integrating the multitude of Web tools and mobile apps into the World Language classroom offers impressive rewards as well as unique challenges. The gamut of tech savviness among teachers runs from low exposure to the completely outfitted, high-tech computer language lab user. Professional development and training in technology for most teachers typically involves instruction on gradebooks or on connecting a laptop to a projector. Left without informed instruction on technology integration, many World Language teachers do not grow beyond a basic comfort level; thereby missing out on valuable opportunities to share academic use of creative and thoughtful tools that will serve students in their post-secondary experiences. In order to encourage students’ creativity and technological awareness, it is essential that educators gain confidence and knowledge in evaluating and adapting the ever-changing list of tools.

Working from the perspective of supporting ACTFL, AP and the Common Core State Standards, participants will engage in an exploration of Web and mobile tools pertinent to listening and speaking tasks using the SAMR and TPACK models. The presenter will engage participants in not only an interactive conversation discussing appropriate and effective tools for both learners and educators, but will also provide focused training on the design and assessment of authentic speaking and listening tasks. Emphasis will be placed on learner skills and growth. Participants will gain concrete skills and comprehension of the tools that they will be able to use directly in their classes and collaboratively with their colleagues. The group will produce a shared document on resources, rubrics, and thematic uses of the tools. Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop computer and (if possible) an iOS device. Applications and sites demonstrated at the session are available on the presenter’s technology Web site: catherine-ousselin.org/technology.html

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Ousselin

Catherine Ousselin

French teacher / Technology Coach, Mount Vernon Schools - Mount Vernon, WA
Integration of technology (blogs, apps, tools, etc) into World Language, Twitter and other social media, authentic resource curation for teachers and learners, French legends and historical events as units, ACTFL Thematic unit planning, Digital Storytelling, Outreach to native speakers of Spanish for French programs and AATF!


Tuesday August 11, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
Lamont B-30 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

9:00am

To Boldly Go…: Facebook, Augmented Reality and the Future of Language Learning
Star Trek’s universal translator, augmented and virtual realities, gaming … and language learning? Social media and augmented/virtual realities are redefining learning environments, creating new arenas that change how we interact with and perceive our world. In this workshop, we review the current language learning landscape, explore where it’s heading, and construct opportunities for educators to take advantage of these new opportunities and ideas.

We’ll examine languages classes based in fluid social media virtual classrooms over a 4 ½ year period. The online and blended/hybrid students are integrated, learning together, and collaborating on transmedia projects. The language classes explore culture in larger scale transdisciplinary projects. The highly personalized assignments are compiled into AR-portfolios. Students finish with applied language as well as transmedia and team-building skills.

In this workshop, participants observe actual online and face-to-face classes taught using a Facebook platform (no other Learning/Course Management Systems), and multidisciplinary and social media projects created by students in a tiered environment. Participants also review student success & retention data. Participants also experience the Facebook platform in a virtual class created especially for this workshop and create their own Facebook classroom. They experiment with examples of student augmented reality projects on their own mobile devices! There are opportunities to create an augmented reality project element.

Materials will be available ahead of time for interested participants to familiarize themselves with the applications.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Lemon

Deborah Lemon

Ohlone College, @One, drlemon


Tuesday August 11, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
William James 1303 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA

9:00am

Using the Library of Foreign Language Film Clips (LFLFC) and Cutting and Tagging Clips in the LFLFC
My institution maintains the Library of Foreign Language Film Clips (LFLFC), an online database of 16,000 film clips drawn from 400+ feature and documentary films in 24 languages. Each clip is tagged for linguistic features, speech acts, and the cultural content of the clip, enabling instructors to search for clips containing, for example, “idiom” or “metaphor”, “greeting” or “persuasion”, “foreigners” or “crime”. Each clip is also tagged for the dictionary form of all spoken language in the clip, which is presented to the student when viewing the clip. This vocabulary list, together with an audio file that has been slowed down by 50%, facilitates comprehension of the clip without resorting to subtitles.

In this hands-on workshop I will go over the main features of the LFLFC: how to search for clips in the database, how to order clips for your students to watch over the Internet, how to annotate clips, how to create lesson plans, how to add a transcript for student viewing, and finally how your institution can obtain access to the LFLFC at no charge. Participants will explore the LFLFC database and order a clip or two for their students to watch. Finally, the workshop will include a discussion on how clips might be integrated into the curriculum.

Speakers
MK

Mark Kaiser

UC Berkeley


Tuesday August 11, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
Science Center B-09 1 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA

12:00pm

12:30pm

IALLT Board & Council Meeting
All IALLT members are invited to attend the IALLT Board & Council Meeting.

Tuesday August 11, 2015 12:30pm - 5:00pm
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

1:30pm

(continued) Thinking about Syncing? Tools for Designing and Assessing Listening and Speaking Tasks
(2nd half of workshop) Harnessing and integrating the multitude of Web tools and mobile apps into the World Language classroom offers impressive rewards as well as unique challenges. The gamut of tech savviness among teachers runs from low exposure to the completely outfitted, high-tech computer language lab user. Professional development and training in technology for most teachers typically involves instruction on gradebooks or on connecting a laptop to a projector. Left without informed instruction on technology integration, many World Language teachers do not grow beyond a basic comfort level; thereby missing out on valuable opportunities to share academic use of creative and thoughtful tools that will serve students in their post-secondary experiences. In order to encourage students’ creativity and technological awareness, it is essential that educators gain confidence and knowledge in evaluating and adapting the ever-changing list of tools.

Working from the perspective of supporting ACTFL, AP and the Common Core State Standards, participants will engage in an exploration of Web and mobile tools pertinent to listening and speaking tasks using the SAMR and TPACK models. The presenter will engage participants in not only an interactive conversation discussing appropriate and effective tools for both learners and educators, but will also provide focused training on the design and assessment of authentic speaking and listening tasks. Emphasis will be placed on learner skills and growth. Participants will gain concrete skills and comprehension of the tools that they will be able to use directly in their classes and collaboratively with their colleagues. The group will produce a shared document on resources, rubrics, and thematic uses of the tools. Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop computer and (if possible) an iOS device. Applications and sites demonstrated at the session are available on the presenter’s technology Web site: catherine-ousselin.org/technology.html

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Ousselin

Catherine Ousselin

French teacher / Technology Coach, Mount Vernon Schools - Mount Vernon, WA
Integration of technology (blogs, apps, tools, etc) into World Language, Twitter and other social media, authentic resource curation for teachers and learners, French legends and historical events as units, ACTFL Thematic unit planning, Digital Storytelling, Outreach to native speakers of Spanish for French programs and AATF!


Tuesday August 11, 2015 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Lamont B-30 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

1:30pm

Changing the Classroom and the World with iBooks Author
iBooks Author is a program that allows the teacher to better engage the class, connect the material to the students, and differentiate among the students based on skill or interest. The session will begin with a one-hour interactive Presentation, which allows the audience to ask questions and go through the material at their own pace. Seeing as how the three presenters have experience in the classroom ranging from teacher- to student-oriented use, we can cover different ways that the audience can incorporate it into their schools. After that we will have a two-hour workshop where we will differentiate based on comfort level with the program. Whether with basic steps or an advanced tutorial, we will enable the audience to leave the room with an understanding of how to use it and why they should.

All three presenters are co-founders of the weekly Twitter #ibookschat. We formed the chat to offer teachers the opportunity to discuss and grow their knowledge of iBooks Author. For more information please check these websites: jabellpepper.weebly.com, mrsmithtrt.weebly.com, and mrfranksclass.com/widgets.

Speakers
avatar for Justin Bell

Justin Bell

teacher, Northeast Magnet High School
I use iBooks Author to differentiate and individualize instruction. I am a 2015 Apple Distinguished Educator. I also, along with Ken Frank, co-started and co-host the weekly #ibookschat.
avatar for Kenneth Frank

Kenneth Frank

Computer Department Chairman, Kellenberg Memorial High School
Ken is an English Teacher and Computer Department Chair at Kellenberg Memorial High School, a Catholic school serving grades 6-12 in Uniondale, NY. With the school's 1:1 iPad transition, Ken oversaw the creation of the school's digital texts, working with teachers to create course-length iBooks and ePubs. He is an Apple Distinguished Educator (2015) and a BookCreator Ambassador.


Tuesday August 11, 2015 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Lamont 400 (LRC) 11 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA

1:30pm

Creating Hypermedia Texts with FLAn
FLAn (Foreign Language Annotator) is a hypermedia editor that allows instructors to create learning units based on any topic or reading source. After the text is processed with FLAn, learners can click on unfamiliar words or phrases and access all the information needed to understand the words or phrases in context. Hypermedia maximizes learner autonomy but can also be used in classroom settings. Annotations linked to words in the reading can be in text format (translations, definitions, cultural notes, grammatical explanations), images, animations, audio (native speaker pronunciation), video, or Web links. Web links in FLAn allow access to online quizzes and activities. No programming knowledge is required to use FLAn for creating instructional materials. Instructors simply add content similar in fashion to a word processor. Text sources could be original materials, dialogs, transcripts to audio and video materials, newspaper articles, poems, song lyrics, etc. FLAn works with virtually any writing system and runs on both Macintosh and PC computers. It can be downloaded for free at proposerswebsite.com.

A one-minute demo of FLAn can be seen on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FN_iCyVTO0k

Workshop participants will create a FLAn unit in the language of their choice and will learn how to integrate various media.
At the end of the workshop they will be able to:
-create a FLAn unit on their own
-know where to access training videos and other support tools
-know how to process images, audio, and video for use in FLAn
-know how to arrange free one-on-one coaching on-line after the workshop
-be familiar with the Web site redhotwords.com, the support site for FLAn.

Speakers
avatar for Thom Thibeault

Thom Thibeault

Director, Language Technology Forum, Samford University
Areas of interest include hypermedia, learner autonomy, Language for Specific Purposes, Less Commonly Taught Languages. I am the author of FLAn (Foreign Language Annotator), a free hypermedia editor available at http://redhotwords.com.


Tuesday August 11, 2015 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Lamont Library - Room 310 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138

5:30pm

Check-in for Pre-Registered Participants
Pick up your badge and bag at the table in front of the Press Room, where the FLEAT VI Opening Reception will be held.

Moderators
EC

Eric Clopper

FLEAT Director of Logistics

Tuesday August 11, 2015 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Omni Parker House Hotel 60 School St, Boston, MA 02108

6:00pm

8:00pm

Pub Crawl
Join us Tuesday evening after the reception for the traditional conference Pub Crawl. We will explore the pubs in the colonial center of Boston near Faneuil Hall, Haymarket, and the Old State House. These historic pubs date to colonial times and are steeped in the atmosphere and lore of the American Revolution. Samuel Adams anyone? Our pubs are conveniently located steps away from the conference hotel, so no transportation is needed.

Tuesday August 11, 2015 8:00pm - 9:30pm
Omni Parker House Hotel 60 School St, Boston, MA 02108
 
Wednesday, August 12
 

8:00am

8:00am

9:00am

Keynote Address: Exceptionalism, Provincialism and Globalization, and the World-Wide Web
Exceptionalism, Provincialism and Globalization, and the World-Wide Web. Does learning a foreign language still matter in an era of globalization? Do the differences in the languages we speak, something so fundamental to our lives, divide us rather than unite us? Perhaps language learning is merely a necessary – but provisional – accommodation we must make on the path to a one harmoniously integrated world.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Bol

Peter Bol

Vice Provost for Advances in Learning, Charles H. Carswell Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University
Peter K. Bol is the Vice Provost for Advances in Learning and the Charles H. Carswell Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University. As Vice Provost (named in 2013/09) he is responsible for HarvardX, the Harvard Initiative in Learning and Teaching, and research that connects online and residential learning. Together with William Kirby he teaches ChinaX (SW12x), one of the HarvardX courses. His research is centered on... Read More →


Wednesday August 12, 2015 9:00am - 10:15am
Sanders Theatre

10:15am

11:00am

A Comparison of EFL Students' Oral Development in an Online Distance Learning Program and in a Classroom-based Learning Program
This longitudinal study compared the oral production of undergraduate EFL students in an online distance learning program and a classroom-based learning program, offered by the Federal University of Ceará (Brazil) for EFL teacher certification. The students from both programs completed oral tasks similar to the TOEFL iBT oral independent questions at the end of each term of study, from first to fourth semester. Their oral productions were analyzed as to fluency, accuracy, and complexity. For fluency, the produced words were divided by time spent completing the task, excluding time for pauses. Two accuracy measures were employed, a syntactic measure (the average of correct clauses per task), and a lexical measure (number of mistaken words divided by number of words produced). For complexity, two measurements were also used, a syntactic measure (number of clauses produced divided by number of AS-units), and a lexical measure (number of different words divided by number of words produced for each task). ANOVA of repeated measures was used to analyze fluency, accuracy, and complexity. The ANOVA assessed the effects of three variables: Group (classroom-based and distance), Time (semesters one through four), and Groups over Time. No significant differences in lexical accuracy and lexical complexity were found between groups, although the groups presented differences in syntactic accuracy, syntactic complexity and fluency. For the analysis of the variable Time, results obtained by all students were analyzed. No significant differences in lexical accuracy and lexical complexity were found for the tasks completed in each of the four semesters, although the completion of the tasks presented differences in syntactic accuracy, syntactic complexity and fluency. When comparing the results obtained by the groups over time, no significant differences were found in each of the parameters; in other words, both groups presented similar development in their oral production.

Speakers
avatar for Joao Tobias Lima Sales

Joao Tobias Lima Sales

Professor and Coordinator, Universidade Estadual do Ceará


Wednesday August 12, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Transparent Language Inc: The 7000 Languages Project: Bringing world-class technology to under-resourced languages
The 7000 Languages Project is a non-profit effort to make world-class language learning technology available at no charge to language teams working with lesser-known and under-resourced languages. By partnering with other expert organizations, web- and mobile-delivered learning materials for the 7,000 languages beyond the 100 or so major world languages can be created. These less-common language resources are then made available to Transparent Language’s subscribing universities, libraries, and organizations at no extra charge. The technology for the 7000 Languages Project is donated by Transparent Language, while partner organizations contribute their linguistic expertise and passion. In this presentation, we will discuss what our partner organizations have accomplished, what we are currently working on, how this benefits our academic and public library customers, and how others can get involved. More information about the 7000 Languages Project can be found at http://www.transparent.com/about/7000-languages-project.html.

Exhibitors
MQ

Michael Quinlan

CEO of Transparent Language


Wednesday August 12, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Engagement, Assessment, and Reflection on International Exchange Opportunities
One of the best ways to experience and cement usage of a foreign language is to engage in an international exchange opportunity. Whether a short few day experience or a long term living arrangement, what is important to the teachers involved will be making sure students learn from the experience. Steps must be taken to prepare students for the experience, assess their engagement during and after the experience, and finally, to help the students reflect on the experience afterwards. The presenter will share the preparation, design, and results (including student created artifacts) of two different exchange type activities. In the first example, 240 Japanese students, an entire class level of students from one school, travelled to Singapore for five days for sightseeing and English language activities. Activities leading up to, during, and after the program will be shared and discussed. Classes were designed with communication-based activities, poster sessions, and presentations. Field work and other activities went on during the exchange. A variety of reflective and culminating activities went on after the students returned. In the second example, eight Japanese students travelled to Florida in the USA for a 10 day English-based environmental science program; intensively fieldwork and research based. Again, activities, ideas, and planning leading up to, during, and after the exchange will be shared. Students were active before and during the exchange on Edmodo. All of their assignments and research was conducted and collaborated on over Google Drive and Google Classroom. They conducted environmental science based research projects during their trip and presented on the projects on their return. They also blogged as well as made websites about their experience. Results and student artifacts show authentic learning occurred and the results and problems experienced will shape future exchange experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Noxon

Erin Noxon

Ed Tech Specialist, Sagano High School
Erin Noxon is a Google Certified Teacher and currently teaches English and Science at Sagano High School, a Super Global and Super Science High School in Kyoto, Japan. Originally from Florida in the USA, she graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science as well as a Masters in Secondary Science Education, both at the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL, USA. She taught English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at a junior high in... Read More →


Wednesday August 12, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
William James 105 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Flip It! Gain Time to Apply Knowledge and Differentiate with Flipped Lessons
Flipped classroom is more than a buzzword, it’s a way to regain lost time and provide support for students where they really need it. This became especially apparent in ITV-based distance courses where lost time due to technology-related delays created great frustration. What language educators don’t realize is that this is a pedagogical hop for them, not a leap. Unlike other disciplines, language educators are very accustomed to and comfortable with students working in groups and pairs as they problem solve, think critically and develop content in the target language to demonstrate their knowledge. Participants in this session will identify techniques to move the “fact learning” lower order thinking skills parts of lessons to independent study and the application of learning to a supported teacher-guided environment. This session demonstrates how flipping lessons regains contact time to focus on applying knowledge, how educators can more easily differentiate for students, and how students help themselves by focusing on their individual needs. Examples provided in several languages and data from Russian ITV courses as well as face-to-face courses supports this approach for any learning environment. A website with sample lessons and technologies that can be integrated to support flipped lessons will be made available to all participants.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Rosen

Lauren Rosen

Collaborative Language Program Director, University of Wisconsin
Lauren Rosen is currently the director of the University of Wisconsin System Collaborative Language Program. For over twenty years she has been integrating technology into her language courses and working closely with K-16 language educators in developing engaging collaborative approaches to technology integration into a variety of learning environments including both traditional and distance courses. She has also designed and taught online... Read More →


Wednesday August 12, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Improving Language Proficiency and Intercultural Communicative Competence through Telecollaboration
Due to the inexhaustible source of materials it provides for the classroom, internet is commonly used for the teaching of languages. In addition to that, it also allows students to establish contact with native and non native speakers of the language they are learning. Among approaches of language and intercultural learning, computer-mediated communication (CMC) has opened up a wide range of opportunities for cross-cultural exchange. Online communication tools not only offer more opportunities than before to interact with peers from distant societies but they also provide an authentic and effective way of preparing learners for intercultural enrichment through partnership. (O’Dowd 2007)

This session reports on practitioner experiences relating how telecollaboration can successfully be used to improve students’ language proficiency as well as their Intercultural Communicative Competence (ICC). Two different contexts are presented.

The first telecollaborative project is set between French second-year engineering students (Béthune University Institute of Technology) and Finnish third-year engineering students (Savonia University of Applied Sciences). The project is spread over 10 weeks and English is used as a Lingua Franca. Only synchronous communication is used and a common website has been created.

The second one involves first-year French and Irish students (Dundalk Institute of Technology) and is spread over a whole academic year. It is bilingual in the sense that 2 languages are used (French for French learners and English for English learners). Communication is synchronous and asynchronous using Web 2.0 tools such as GoogleHangouts, Skype, Audacity, a wiki and emails.

A survey is being conducted in order to evaluate the impact of the online exchanges on students’ language and intercultural skills.

During the session, the structure and outcomes and challenges of these experiences will be discussed and some preliminary results will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Laurence de Gruil

Laurence de Gruil

English teacher, Béthune Institute of Technology, University of Artois, France
I teach BE and ESP to engineering students in an Institute of Technology in France and I am getting more and more interested in using new technologies (ICT) to meet my students' needs. | Telecollaboration or online intercultural exchange is my main focus and I would be delighted to meet colleagues sharing the same interest.


Wednesday August 12, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Putting the Pedagogy into the Technology
Publishing pupils’ multimedia work to a potentially worldwide audience can motivate children, raise standards in their work, promote creativity and give them a real purpose for their language learning. It can also facilitate assessment for learning opportunities, distance learning, forge international links, and celebrate pupil voice.

However, the plethora of web tools and apps currently available to teachers is overwhelming. So which ones are the most effective for enhancing language learning? One powerful solution to this question is drawing on a personal learning network and crowd sourcing ideas. This is exactly what is happening on a daily basis with the #MFLtwitterati, a trailblazing community from the UK interested in exploring the power of technology such as iPads in the classroom and flipped learning in a positive and collaborative way. This presentation will highlight the importance of having a growth mindset when approaching the use of technology and how we should use it only when it leads to enhancement or transformation in learning not as a bolt on or substitute for traditional pedagogy.

Speakers

Wednesday August 12, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Single vs. Dual Language Virtual Exchange
The European Commission co-financed INTENT project defines Virtual Exchanges (VE) as “technology-enabled, sustained, people to people education programs. These entail the engagement of groups of students in online intercultural exchange, interaction and collaboration with peers from partner classes in geographically distant locations, under the guidance of educators and/or expert facilitators.” Students, particularly in regional universities, have few opportunities to physically interact with users of the language they are studying – VE introduces these students to others in countries around the world giving them virtual mobility and showing them that the language they are learning is useful in many ways. There is a growing body of research showing that virtual exchange can improve language learning outcomes in addition to intercultural communicative competence. The US, via the world readiness standards, and most other countries are asking their educators to promote cultural understanding and improve the language skills of their charges. VE is a powerful means to bring those goals to fruition. VE can take many forms. In this presentation the author outlines two types of VE. The first is single language VE where English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students from Colombia, Japan, Malaysia and Vietnam interact online in English as a lingua franca. The second is dual language VE where EFL students in Japan interact with Japanese as a Foreign Language students in the US and Australia. They use both Japanese and English in the exchanges. The exchanges were carried out over 8 week periods using Moodle's forums and wikis. Some students also used Skype. The outcomes of these two different types of VE will be outlined using data gained from pre and post tests as well as from text analysis and student feedback. Single and dual language VE have both benefits and drawbacks and these will be outlined too.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Hagley

Eric Hagley

Muroran Institute of Technology
Eric has been carrying out virtual exchanges using Moodle. Students in Japan study with students in other countries and practice the language they are studying. He welcomes others to join.



Wednesday August 12, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Using Academic Writing Wizard in Teaching Pragmatic Strategies in Academic Writing
Academic Writing Wizard, AWW, is a new web-based application for teaching academic writing. The author originated this application to help students develop a textual and pragmatic awareness when writing their academic assignments. An important goal that AWW helps students achieve is creating a lexical web that reflects their pragmatic choices, especially contextualized speech acts, pragmemes, made by the students to persuade their readers. This presentation investigates pragmemic dialogicality in academic texts through using a new framework for academic writing, Lexical Cohesive Trio, LCT. Using this trio has helped the author's students at the Gulf University for Science and Technology, GUST, in Kuwait significantly in consciously recognizing pragmemic dialogicality in academic writing. Based on LCT elements in the students’ essays, which include transitional signals, anaphora and cataphora, patterns of lexical repetitions, and lexical phrases based on academic corpora, the author would like to show that pragmemes are used in a particular fashion in academic texts. A group of the author's students was asked to use AWW for writing one of their assignments, selecting transitional signals, pronouns and their antecedents, lexical repetitions, and academic lexical phrases. The results were analysed using an SPSS package t-test. A pairwise t-test confirmed that more transitional signals were produced after the framework was used: t(1,29) = –4.938, p-value < 0.001. Similarly, a pairwise t-test confirmed that more lexical repetitions were produced after the framework was used: t(1,29) = –5.218, p-value < 0.001. Finally, a pairwise t-test confirmed that significantly more lexical phrases were produced after the framework was used: t(1,29) = –10.672, p-value < 0.001. Results proved that the chosen group of English students at GUST succeeded in consciously using pragmemes reflecting their ideological inclinations. This was achieved thanks to using the new writing software, which relies on pre-planning academic essays.

Speakers
HA

Hussain Al Sharoufi

Gulf University for Science and Technology-Kuwait


Wednesday August 12, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
CGIS South S050 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

The Columbia/Yale/Cornell Shared Course Initiative: Creating a Collaborative Model of Instruction
Over the past few years, universities have explored how technology-mediated learning can supplement or even replace traditional teaching and learning paradigms. MOOCs and “flipped classrooms” are just two examples of online models enabled by advances in technology.

Columbia, Cornell and Yale have recently developed a collaborative framework that allows them to offer a variety of less commonly taught languages that are increasingly difficult for universities to support. The Shared Course Initiative (SCI) uses high-definition videoconferencing to recreate a synchronous, interactive and learner-centered environment, designed to address the specific needs of a highly interactive language classroom.

In this presentation, we will describe the model, provide an overview of its affordances, and present a summary of its technical, pedagogical, and administrative benefits and challenges. We will also discuss how such a model can support the creation of communal spaces where students can form communities of practice dedicated to the fruitful exploration of knowledge and engage in critical dialogues with both teachers and peers. This model has the potential for significant curricular and institutional transformation beyond language instruction. Institutions can engage in the creation of collaborative curricula as well as leverage its innovative approach to sharing academic resources across institutional boundaries in order to allow students and faculty to access sources of knowledge regardless of where these are located.

Speakers
SC

Stéphane Charitos

Columbia University
RF

Richard Feldman

Director, Language Resource Center - Cornell University
avatar for David Malinowski

David Malinowski

Language Technology & Research Specialist, Yale Center for Language Study
avatar for Steve Welsh

Steve Welsh

Senior Program Manager, Distance Learning, Columbia University Language Resource Center
I'm the Program Manager for Distance Learning at the Columbia Language Resource Center, where I coordinate the Shared Course Initiative, a Mellon-funded collaboration between Columbia, Cornell, and Yale to share instruction of less commonly taught languages. I'm also a doctoral student in Communications, Media and Learning Technology Design, currently working on my dissertation.


Wednesday August 12, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

12:00pm

Agency and Control in Virtual Exchanges and Computer-assisted Language Learning
This presentation will reflect on theoretical issues related to student agency in virtual exchanges and computer-assisted language learning. The data from a virtual exchange between American and Spanish students will be examined through the lens of key SLA notions: “interaction” (Long, 1983, 1985; Pica, 1992; Gass, 2003), “authenticity” (Kramsch, 1993; van Lier, 1996; Magnan, 2008), “control” (Benson, 2010; Lewis & Vialleton, 2011; Huang & Benson, 2013), “investment” (Norton, 2013), and “agency” (Lantolf & Thorne, 2006; van Lier, 2008). The role that these concepts may play in defining good pedagogical practices for virtual exchanges and computer-assisted language learning will be discussed. Drawing on Foucault’s (1995) insights on power and surveillance, I will suggest that practitioners of virtual exchange and computer-assisted language teaching should be aware of the tensions that arise between the important role that autonomy and agency seem to play in language learning (Lantolf & Thorne, 2006; van Lier, 2008; Huang & Benson, 2013) and the prevalence of educational models and instruments promoting control and accountability.

Speakers
avatar for Alberto Bruzos Moro

Alberto Bruzos Moro

Director, Spanish Language Program, Princeton University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 12:00pm - 12:25pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

12:00pm

Designing Effective Curricula with an Interactive Collaborative Curriculum Design Tool (CCDT)
This workshop will introduce a unit curriculum design by use of an interactive and online collaborative curriculum design tool (CCDT) to those who are interested in creating innovative instructional materials for their learners. Although CCDT can be used in various disciplines, the specific area that this interactive tool will focus on will be ESL, with an emphasis on a content-based, academic adult ESL course. CCDT helps educators and instructional designers build learning/teaching environments that are collaborative and authentic. Use of CCDT will provide those attending this workshop with an opportunity to design an instructional product that can emerge as highly engaging, meaningful, and fun for students. ESL educators, curriculum/instructional designers, or simply instructors who seek to design innovative, effective, and efficient lesson plans and curricula in their particular field are welcome.

Speakers
avatar for Seda Khadimally

Seda Khadimally

TESOL Instructor/Digital Learning Specialist, California College of Communications (CalCC)
Seda Khadimally specializes in Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) and second language acquisition, with a focus on teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) to speakers of other languages. She has designed, delivered, and evaluated instruction, by continuous use of educational technologies (both online and blended learning) as she has taught her diverse groups of learners for almost 14 years. She enjoys working with diverse populations... Read More →


Wednesday August 12, 2015 12:00pm - 12:25pm
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

12:00pm

SANSSpace™ Virtual, the Next Level: Web Based Language Learning System for Synchronous and Asynchronous Environments
SANSSpace™ Virtual creates the Ultimate Language Learning Environment using any Platform/OS. Comparative Audio and Video Recording, Oral Proficiency Interviews You Tube Import, all contained in one location, accessible from anywhere. Teachers can be extremely creative using Content they want and need from ANY publisher. Synchronous Live Instruction Development will be introduced for the first time at this session. Synchronous focus will be on Interpersonal Pairing, Live Oral testing and AP® Exam Instructional tools. Examples will be presented from Middlebury Language Schools and other High School usage experiences.

Exhibitors

Wednesday August 12, 2015 12:00pm - 12:25pm
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

12:00pm

Results of the 2015 IALLT Language Center/Lab Director Survey
IALLT periodically surveys the community of language center/lab directors to investigate the state of language centers and the positions and duties of their directors. To begin disseminating the findings of the 2015 survey to the IALLT membership, we will present the results of key questions regarding language center management and design. To maximize their usefulness, the results will be reported by institution type and size. We will include data such as the average budget and allocations for language centers, the director’s average salary, the director’s typical teaching load, and how recently the typical center has been completely redesigned. We will also provide data on new space usage patterns in language centers.

Speakers
avatar for Felix Kronenberg

Felix Kronenberg

Associate Prof., Modern Languages & Director of the Language Learning Center, Rhodes College
avatar for Betsy Lavolette

Betsy Lavolette

Director, Language Resource Center, Gettysburg College


Wednesday August 12, 2015 12:00pm - 12:25pm
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

12:00pm

A Corpus-based Study of L1 Transfer in Discourse Marker Use
This research focuses on the influence of the first language (L1) transfer on discourse marker use in the second language (L2). Some researchers (e.g., Liu, 2013; Sankoff et al., 1997) conducted a contrastive analysis of L1 and L2 speech and suggested that non-native speakers’ use of discourse markers in their L1 may be transferred to their use of English discourse markers. However, there have been only a few detailed studies investigating the effect of L1 on discourse marker use by non-native speakers of English. To rectify the inadequacies, the current research comprises two cross-linguistic studies. The first study applied contrastive analysis to English-Japanese parallel corpus data: English speech data extracted from a Japanese EFL learner corpus and their Japanese translations. Through the comparison using the parallel data, the analysis revealed some correspondences between English and Japanese discourse markers. Based on the findings of the parallel texts, in the second study, a small-scale experiment was carried out using a picture description task. The learners’ L1 and L2 utterances were collected under the same task condition to explore how the use of Japanese discourse markers influenced the use of English discourse markers. The results of the quantitative and qualitative analyses suggested that the use of Japanese discourse markers or fillers may cause the overuse of some markers such as “and,” “so,” and “but.” Although the study conducted a limited observation of certain discourse markers, these findings may be part of the evidence of L1 influence on discourse marker use in L2 learners’ speech and contribute to identifying the features of their acquisition of discourse markers.

Speakers
KS

Kazunari Shimada

Takasaki University of Health and Welfare


Wednesday August 12, 2015 12:00pm - 12:25pm
CGIS South S050 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

12:00pm

A Book Review Game, Bibliobattle, for English Learners to Build an Open Community Online
Bibliobattle is a social book review game played nationwide in Japan since its birth in 2007. The number of players has been growing remarkably. In only 2014 the number of events held was estimated to be at least 1300. The authors, faculties from three universities, started the English version of the game in 2013 to utilize this movement for English learners to have the opportunity to make speeches and conduct discussions outside of their universities. The objective of the game is to introduce a book and decide on the “champion book” by a democratic vote. As the champion book is not elected by how well the player gives a presentation but by how much they make the participants want to read the book, this game can be played among people with a great diversity of English proficiency levels. The authors have held events with a variety of groups, such as students only, students and teachers, students and adult learners, etc. A Facebook group has been used to call for presenters to exchange any related information and to share opinions. Presentation videos have also been uploaded online in accordance with Bibliobattle official recommendations. The authors have also developed a guidebook and instruction videos available online, which have effectively publicized the game to English learners in Japan. Through the implementation of 16 events in 2013 and 2014, these online support tools turned out to play a major role in building an open community not only among current participants but also potential participants. Even though these potential participants have not joined events, they can still watch presentation videos, share opinions and have the chance to meet a good book and new people. These online support tools consequently enable both current and potential participants to share the experiences and make the game more “social”.

Speakers
avatar for Syuhei Kimura

Syuhei Kimura

Associate Professor, Ritsumeikan University
Syuhei KIMURA is an educator at Ritsumeikan University and his research interest is how ICT can be utilized effectively in college English education.
avatar for Yukie Kondo

Yukie Kondo

Ritsumeikan University
avatar for Mayumi OGA

Mayumi OGA

Ritsumeikan University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 12:00pm - 12:25pm
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

12:00pm

Accounting for Vocabulary Learning Theories in an Online Course Teaching Academic Words
This presentation outlines the design of an online vocabulary learning system that used free internet learning tools to teach academic vocabulary to a class of 45 Japanese university students enrolled in an oral English communication class. It begins by introducing academic vocabulary and reviewing the nature and challenges of studying words that are more abstract and functional in meaning and usage. It then proceeds to the pilot study which explored design issues and examined learner attitudes for areas of improvement in student-centered interviews. From these interviews, shortcomings like video length, student-teacher interaction, and limitations in the mobile application were ascertained. Focus then turns to the main study which, in accordance with major vocabulary learning theories, incorporated noticing, spaced retrieval, contextually-driven input and output, generative use, and morpheme instruction into a weekly online study course (Schmidt, 1990; Nation, 2001). Two online learning platforms—Edmodo, which functioned as an online classroom, and Memrise, which was used for explicit presentation of words and rote practicing, formed the main components of the system and provided mobile and desktop learning environments. Analysis of pretests and posttests showed significant improvements in productive knowledge and receptive knowledge with an increase in average test scores of 36% and 4% respectively. A separate morpheme test also revealed significant improvements for word knowledge, root knowledge, and word part recognition. Combining these results with participants’ questionnaire responses, strengths and weaknesses are identified in respect to the methodological approach and technical facilities. For example, word part recognition would have likely seen a greater improvement had a more systematic approach been taken to morpheme teaching. Finally, conclusions are made with relation to aspects of word knowledge and Nation’s four strands approach, the SAMR model, and trends in ICT.

Speakers
BM

Bruce MALCOLM

Osaka Kyoiku University
MS

Mishka Sulva

Osaka Kyoiku University
HY

Haruyo Yoshida

Osaka Kyoiku University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 12:00pm - 12:25pm
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

12:00pm

Beyond the Single Language Classroom: The Modern Greek Experience at Harvard
The use of google documents has provided the students and instructors of Modern Greek at Harvard in spring 2015 to build a community of interest and engagement beyond the confines of their language classrooms. Thus, a larger community of learners constituted of three classes (15 students, one head instructor and three TAs) has been built around Modern Greek language and culture instruction outside the comforting presence of physical “place.” The word is about the Modern Greek A/Ba/B video-performance collaborative final project at Harvard, entitled Waiting for Eva, a funny adaptation of Samuel Becket’s play Waiting for Godot (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccYgoo6Mk8U), which also draws on the novella An August on the Island of Spetses by Kleanthis Arvanitakis.
This final project, thanks to technology, gave students the opportunity to work with students from the other levels of Greek and thus learn from each other. On the one hand, the advanced students functioned as mentors to the lower-level students while the latter aspired to reach the level of the former. They increased all language skills because they were able to see how the different aspects of theater work. They were writers, actors, directors, translators, and movie editors, while they had a great time in each role. They liked the final project because they put the Greek language and culture in one play. They were writing, speaking, and thinking in Greek. And the best part was that they did it all together with their peers, their Greek at different levels, but all together in one language and one school, the virtual “Café Monastiraki”.
Using google documents, the students of Modern Greek at three different levels were challenged to rethink the possibilities for building communities around language and culture instruction outside the comforting presence of physical “place,” while they kept expanding their community of learners of Modern Greek by having downloaded their play on youtube, which will be also recycled next year for another language project. This 25-minute session will present the challenges and the benefits of such a seemingly daunting task that becomes possible thanks to the new technologies available for language instruction.
The use of google documents has provided the students and instructors of Modern Greek at Harvard in spring 2015 to build a community of interest and engagement beyond the confines of their language classrooms. Thus, a larger community of learners constituted of three classes (15 students, one head instructor and three TAs) has been built around Modern Greek language and culture instruction outside the comforting presence of physical “place.” The word is about the Modern Greek A/Ba/B video-performance collaborative final project at Harvard, entitled Waiting for Eva, a funny adaptation of Samuel Becket’s play Waiting for Godot (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccYgoo6Mk8U), which also draws on the novella An August on the Island of Spetses by Kleanthis Arvanitakis.

This final project, thanks to technology, gave students the opportunity to work with students from the other levels of Greek and thus learn from each other. On the one hand, the advanced students functioned as mentors to the lower-level students while the latter aspired to reach the level of the former. They increased all language skills because they were able to see how the different aspects of theater work. They were writers, actors, directors, translators, and movie editors, while they had a great time in each role. They liked the final project because they put the Greek language and culture in one play. They were writing, speaking, and thinking in Greek. And the best part was that they did it all together with their peers, their Greek at different levels, but all together in one language and one school, the virtual “Café Monastiraki”.

Using google documents, the students of Modern Greek at three different levels were challenged to rethink the possibilities for building communities around language and culture instruction outside the comforting presence of physical “place,” while they kept expanding their community of learners of Modern Greek by having downloaded their play on youtube, which will be also recycled next year for another language project. This 25-minute session will present the challenges and the benefits of such a seemingly daunting task that becomes possible thanks to the new technologies available for language instruction.

Speakers
VR

Vassiliki Rapti

Harvard University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 12:00pm - 12:25pm
Jefferson 256 17 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA

12:00pm

Video blogging: Empowering Student Voices in the English Classroom
Innovation in technology has given English language learners the freedom and the power to express themselves in various platforms of digital media. This phenomenon has also provided new techniques and methodologies to English language teaching professionals for possibilities of learning English inside the classroom. A new method of introducing "dynamic content and technologically enhanced pedagogical techniques to students in a variety of disciplines" is video blogging (Taylor, 2013).

This research focuses on the role of video blogs as an activity and evaluation tool in the oral communication classroom. It also places the interpersonal context as a factor that affects the language attitudes of the selected participants towards speaking English. Given the complex nature of this research, data gathering involves focus group discussions and survey questionnaires. Results show that a significant number of student vloggers expressed that they have improved self-confidence in using spoken English inside the classroom because of this new technology.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Arthur Payumo Abalos

Mark Arthur Payumo Abalos

Graduate Student, University of the Philippines - Diliman


Wednesday August 12, 2015 12:00pm - 12:25pm
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

12:30pm

FLEAT 6 Luncheon
Meet and network with fellow conference attendees who live in your region.

Wednesday August 12, 2015 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Annenberg Hall

2:00pm

An Approach to Analyze and Select Film Segments Based on Learners' Vocabulary Levels
Abstract:

Video segments from foreign language films and TV dramas have appeared in language teaching, learning and testing for several years, especially since the advent of the digital format became popular. There are many advantages such as appeal and interest, authenticity of materials, dialogic discourse and natural context, real language settings, language with culture, better comprehension, student motivation, flexible teaching and learning activities, etc. However, the process is time-consuming and it can be difficult to find video segments from films or TV series to appropriately match lessons and students’ linguistic competence apart from the technological demands. Using 21 Chinese films, this presentation will reports at which level and how much of the foreign language films can be understood based on students’ vocabulary levels. Moreover, a practical approach applicable to all languages will be demonstrated that quickly match and highlight the words in the film subtitles using a list of vocabulary words by lessons, levels and textbooks. Additionally, a simple and free video tool will be demonstrated to extract exemplary segments quickly.

Description:

Digital video clips from films and TV series have appeared more frequently in language teaching, and learning, especially when video on demand technology became popular. These clips frequently appear on video hosting sites and in learning management systems. Educators have taken advantage of the video clips for teaching and learning as well as conducted studies on the effectiveness of multimodal learning such as text with picture vs. video clips (Chun & Plass, 1996; CISCO System, INC, 2008). Some institutions even developed their own video retrieval systems (Jeng, et al., 2008), MPEG-7 descriptors (Bertini et al., 2006), or online library of film clips (Kaiser, 2011). However, when examining actual usage, the presenter found that very few instructors took advantage of the video materials made accessible to his institution.

This presentation will report how many registered instructors requested foreign language film clips for actual instruction, how frequently they requested the films and/or clips, and what percentage of vocabulary words at a particular level matched the film subtitles based on corpus analysis. Because Chinese instructors attended an introductory presentation and an additional hands-on workshop, the presenter will explore their usage and further issues related to finding appropriate film clips. Even though the instructors had access to the online film clip library, it was not open to the public and few of the films are tagged in full length. The presenter will show a simple and practical method to match and highlight subtitles of 21 Chinese films available to his institution and students’ vocabulary levels based on a lesson or particular level. The method may benefit attendees who do not have access to video retrieval systems but wish to incorporate video clips into their curricula. Additionally, the audience will see how to quickly extract the selected segments with a free video tool.

Speakers
FZ

Fuqiang Zhuo

University of California, Davis


Wednesday August 12, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
William James 105 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Robotel Inc: Language Teaching in a BYOD Environment
Many schools no longer support traditional computer-based language labs. In high schools, we are seeing one-to-one programs, where students are issued portable devices, (such as iPads or Chromebooks), and then bring these devices to class. In universities, students’ portable devices might range anywhere from laptops to smart phones. This presentation/demonstration addresses how multi-device BYOD support can be implemented using the SmartClass+ language teaching platform.

Exhibitors
BG

Bill Gagnon

Sales Manager, Robotel
We have an amazing intuitive interface that lets you manage a classroom from Desktops to Tablets . It might be used to teach anything from Languages to Arts (AutoCad & AutoDesk).
GS

Gerry Sullivan

Robotel Inc.


Wednesday August 12, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
CGIS South S050 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Copyright Basics: Understanding Copyright in Terms of the LRC
New to copyright? Or just confused by all of the terms? This session will go over the basic concepts of copyright law as well as explain the most pertinent aspects to frame this confusing topic in terms of what you really need to understand, the implications to the language lab/language teaching, and strategies for navigating basic needs.

Included in this discussion are strategies to implement in the course of managing a resource center, as well as and tips and resources for navigating this very confusing territory.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Evershed

Julie Evershed

Director, Language Resource Center, University of Michigan


Wednesday August 12, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

The LRC Director as CALL Guru: A Phenomenological Study
Directors of Language Resource Centers and Language Labs seek to position themselves at the nexus of CALL and pedagogy. In order to maintain their leadership and expertise among their institutions, departments, and students, directors of such facilities must balance a variety of considerations when deciding whether to acquire or create CALL-specific or more generic technology solutions for the language learners and faculty they support. These myriad factors require decisions to be made with regard to pedagogical orientation of given solutions, cost, technical support, and provider reputation. The presenter will discuss the findings of his doctoral dissertation research, in which 25 Language Resource Center and Language Lab directors, all members of the International Association for Language Learning Technology, participated in individual semi-structured interviews. The phenomenological study sought to chronicle and provide a 3-dimensional view of the multifaceted experience of contemporary directors in their decision-making in selecting CALL solutions for their colleges and universities. The presenter will discuss the theoretical framework for the study, including the published research context, the research questions, the methodology employed, the population that was interviewed, the results of the study, its limitations, and the potential areas for further inquiry. The presenter will share proposed conclusions about the varying nature of the experience of Language Resource Center and Language Lab directors, and what this study revealed about the larger realities of their roles within institutions and their perspectives on how they see their professional stature within universities or academic departments. Similarities and differences along the lines of missions, budgets, languages supported, levels of languages offered, commonly-taught vs. less commonly taught languages offered, and other variables that emerged in the study will contribute a larger discussion of the phenomenon with those in attendance, during the open discussion portion of the presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Samuels

Jeffrey Samuels

President and CEO, World Languages 360
Longstanding IALLT member, former language instructor and language resource center director. Currently employed in higher education curriculum development (online), concurrently in early startup stages of World Languages 360, Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of language learning in the workplace and career readiness. Ph.D. in Information Technology-Education. Dissertation topic related to CALL. Presenting results of... Read More →


Wednesday August 12, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Creating Community in an EFL Teacher Ed MOOC
Effective teacher training aims at creating a community of practice (Lave and Wenger, 1991), where participants feel comfortable sharing ideas with and learning from each other. Teachers can build community relatively easily in small classes. A massive open online course (MOOC) with 20,000 participants is more of a challenge. This session will demonstrate how an English language teacher training MOOC was structured and delivered.

From the outset we wanted to build a cMOOC, a connectivist MOOC (Downes, 2009), which we interpreted as an online course where participant interaction would be fundamental. Besides the cMOOCs roots in collaborative learning and constructivism, we saw participant interaction as the key to overcoming the challenges of the "massive" part of the course: the many different backgrounds, ages, prior teaching experiences, and kinds of training our anticipated audience would be bringing to the MOOC.

We will demonstrate how the course developers chose different elements in the Coursera platform, including videos, discussions, different kinds of quizzes, and peer grading. And, perhaps just as importantly, we discuss the changes we implemented to the second and third iterations as a result of instructor experience, user surveys, course evaluations, and Coursera analytics.

Finally, we will explain how these instructional elements were combined with informal communication options like contests to foster a sense of community and shared purpose. Results and implications for others with an interest in taking or creating a MOOC will also be offered. Participants will be invited to describe their experience with MOOCs, sharing what has worked and what could be improved.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Magoto

Jeff Magoto

Director, Yamada Language Center, University of Oregon
CALL, language centers, and teacher training.


Wednesday August 12, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Globalization and a New Model for Teaching Englishes via Videoconference: Connecting EFL Students with the World.
This presentation will discuss how a telecollaborative panel discussion may bring together experts located around the world to enhance the student learning process in the areas of language, culture and content. The presenters will illustrate this concept with video examples of a panel which consisted of four scholars from Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, and the U.S. The panel discussed topics related to English as an International Language (EIL) and World Englishes via a five-way Skype video call that was also recorded and live-streamed. Viewers in classes of two of the presenters and also those joining via live streaming had the opportunity to join in the conversation.

The attendees will receive useful insights and pedagogical implications for teaching English language or English for Specific Purpose (ESP) when integrating Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) in their own educational context. The practical tips and suggestions offered by the presenters are based from their own work experiences in EFL/ESL settings, so that the ideas should be applicable to diverse foreign language learning and teaching contexts.

The presentation will have three parts: First, the presenters will explain the background and impetus of incorporating Skype into the coursework and discuss potential educational outcomes by sharing students’ perception on the panel discussion through teleconference. Second, they will demonstrate how they coordinated the teleconferencing in three main points: 1) The interests of research and teaching areas; 2) the importance of academic network; and 3) the application of educational technology. They will also present a new, potential framework for teleconference in the field of language/culture learning and teaching. Third, they will show the attendees “how” they can create a telecollaborative panel, including a variety of tools like Skype, live stream, and how to record the panel for later use.

Speakers
JJ

John JuSeong Lee

University of Illinois at Urbana-Chamapign
YN

Yuji Nakamura

Keio University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Making EFL Academic Writing Meaningful for Undergraduates: A Wikipedia Project Based in Japan
Against the backdrop of decreasing global impact factors and rates of publication by academic scholars based in Japan, Japanese universities are increasingly incorporating academic writing courses into undergraduate curricula to prepare future scholars at an earlier stage (Tajino, 2008). Nonetheless, making academic writing authentic and meaningful for first-year university students is a formidable task, especially if writing assignments are only viewed by their teachers. This presentation will describe an attempt to address this conundrum in undergraduate classes at a prestigious research-university in Japan through a Wikipedia project. 350 students in first-year English academic writing classes wrote Wikipedia articles on topics meaningful to them, uploaded them onto Wikipedia, monitored their articles, and interacted with Wikipedia editors located all over the world. Design of the project focused not on the product of the writing, but more on building awareness of gender, developing student research skills, and preparing students to be ready to navigate the unfamiliar terrain of international academia. The presentation will outline the pre-writing, research, drafting, uploading, and post-uploading stages of the project while also discussing ways in which the author would recommend organizing the project more effectively based on her experiences doing the project for the first time. It will also analyze results of a qualitative study on students perceptions of their experience doing the project and of their own English writing ability. Preliminary results indicate that many students gained confidence in their English writing competence by being able to contribute their knowledge to the world while negotiating with Wikipedia editors about their articles post-upload.

Speakers
JT

Jennifer Teeter

Kyoto University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Using Google Communities for Spanish Language Teaching: Challenges in Building Effective Discourse Communities
With more than 340 million users, Google Plus Community [GPC] is a digital social network community offering immense potential for strengthening language learning. Social networked learning in a higher education setting involves a complex web of interactions between learners, their peers, the instructor, and other online resources. Incidental points of connection do happen. But do they translate to deep learning? The networked learning environment can be meaningful only when discourse management produces a community of practice.

We will examine a test case integrating GPC within an undergraduate Spanish language course in a liberal arts curriculum. Several elements of GPC proved advantageous: Ease of use and integration with mobile devices, ability to post different types of media; easy feedback through “like” posts and comments; push notifications that trigger participation; option of private or public community; categories for easy organization of learning; links to Google Hangouts and other Google apps (e.g. Blogger or Google Slides) that expand the digital networked environment beyond GPC. One important result was student preference of GPC over the discussion board in the regular Blackboard LMS. We will provide several visual snapshots from the coursework as concrete examples of student learning.

Despite these effective learning design features, the points of connections within GPC did not always translate into a community of learners. Critical analysis of this issue raises three important pedagogical questions for using GPC to enhance collaborative learning:

1) How can shared digital learning spaces be designed so that connected nodes lead to community building?

2) How do the interactional tasks within Google Plus enhance language learning?

3) How does the role of learner identity affect learning within a networked environment?

Building on instructor observations and student survey results, this presentation will conclude with practical strategies for using social network communities in language learning.

Speakers
JK

Jaya Kannan

Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT 06825
avatar for Pilar Munday

Pilar Munday

Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT 06825


Wednesday August 12, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Moving to Online Language, Literature, and Culture Courses: Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation
In this session participants will gain insights about issues surrounding the planning, implementation, and evaluation of online language, literature and culture courses. Furthermore, participants will also be provided with a research-based framework for effecting the transition from face-to-face to online courses.

Panelists will begin with an overview of the move to online language, literature and culture instruction at their institutions. Panelists will describe both the current online environment (number and types of fully and blended online courses, student demographics, and instructor details) and the background for their online initiative (history of why and when online offerings were established). Then they will describe their online initiative in terms of factors critical to their successful move to online learning, which include:

• Vision and goals;
• Strategic planning;
• Institutional and departmental leadership commitment and support;
• Leadership role of language lab director and language lab;
• Faculty leadership, commitment, and support;
• Resources provided to faculty and students;
• Online course development processes and timeline;
• Delivery format modes;
• Teacher training and student preparation;
• Outcome measures;
• Quality control measures; and
• Efforts to sustain momentum.

Next, a framework based on leadership and change that integrates the individual success factors into a model for implementing online learning initiatives will be presented. From the experiences of institutions successful in online initiatives best practices and leadership strategies for successful online learning implementation are identified in the literature. Due to the complexities involved, the establishment of online offerings within a university is tantamount to effecting institutional change. According to the research on organizational change, for any change initiative to be successful, leadership at multiple levels is imperative. The move from traditional to online language, literature and culture courses may be viewed as a change initiative requiring multi-level leadership and a comprehensive framework. The leadership and change model for online learning implementation offers an explanation for the successful move to online language, literature and culture courses at the panelists’ institutions and a framework to those embarking on such a move.

Speakers
RB

Rebecca Berber-McNeill

Arizona State University
SG

Sangeetha Gopalakrishnan

Wayne State University
avatar for Kathryn Murphy-Judy

Kathryn Murphy-Judy

Assoc. Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University
avatar for Andrew Ross

Andrew Ross

Head, Learning Support Services, Arizona State University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 2:00pm - 3:15pm
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

Aviation English and Listening Problems at High Rates of Speech
The ultimate aim of our research is to improve the listening ability at high rates of speech for Japanese airline transport pilots (ATP) and air traffic controllers (ATC) who are non-native speakers of English (NNSE). Listening errors occur with fast speech rates, and over the past several years, we have been trying to pinpoint exactly when and where the errors occur. In our measurement of over 10,000 sentences in movies, we found English spoken at a median of 5.1 syllables per second (sps), similar to other reports of speech rates in daily life. We found that 31 high English-ability Japanese NNSE missed or mistook words increasingly at faster speech speeds; 4.2% missed words at 4 sps, 12.6% at 5 sps, 21.2% at 6 sps, 32.7% at 7 sps, and 40.6% at 8 sps. Our measurement of some 4,000 sentences spoken by ATP and ATC in the USA found a median of 6.1 sps, a rate 20% higher than standard speech speed and which can cause problems for NNSE pilots. Our survey of 33 Japanese ATP and ATC revealed places where they stumbled in their listening.

While our research is focused on aviation English, our results hopefully can stimulate ideas and programs to improve listening ability for all English learners, who face more or less the same problem.

Speakers
avatar for Walter Klinger

Walter Klinger

University of Shiga Prefecture
*using films, film songs, tv shows, comedy tv show skits for esl/efl. | *improving listening ability at high speech rates. | *evaluation rubrics, incl. cefr and cerf-j. | *what can NSE teachers do better than NNSE teachers (i.e., curricula should be modified to use teachers' strengths).
HN

Haruhiko Nitta

Senshu University
HO

Hironobu Okazaki

Akita Prefectural University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

The Effect of Shadowing on Subvocal Rehearsal in L2 Reading: An Experiment Using NIRS for Japanese ESL Learners
Shadowing is a task for improving listening and speaking abilities in L2, in which learners track the heard speech and repeat it as exactly as possible while listening attentively to incoming messages. In the discussion of the effectiveness of the shadowing practice, Kadota (2007, 2012) argues that one of the potential effects of the L2 shadowing is to enhance the speed and efficiency of the subvocal rehearsals in the phonological working memory, and to enhance implicit learning of lexical chunks such as formulaic sequences, etc.

The experiment to be reported is an attempt to compare the brain activation in shadowing and listening and to investigate how shadowing and listening practices differently affect the learners’ behavioral and neural process of subvocalization in reading English silently. Twenty-eight participants learning English as a foreign language (FL) in Japan were instructed to subvocalize (i.e., utter internally) a total of ten English passages in pre- and post-tests while tracing with a cotton swab the lines of the text they were reading, and their behaviors were video-taped. In addition, the learners’ cerebral activities (i.e. the amount of oxyhemoglobin) were measured using the NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy: Shimazu FOIRE 3000) with a set of 24 channels for each of the left and right hemispheres. The main results were:

1) Shadowing leads to significantly more cerebral activation than listening in such regions as the Broca’s area, frontal cortex, etc..

2) While no significant difference is observed as to the cerebral activation between the after-shadowing and after-listening reading tests, there is a significant increase in reading comprehension rate and conscious subvocalization speed in the after-shadowing reading test.

With these findings, the present research suggests that shadowing may not only enhance the L2 learners’ cerebral activities but increase the L2 learners’ while-reading subvocal rehearsal efficiency in the phonological working memory.


This presentation was made possible with contributions from the following researchers:

HASE, Naoya, Kwansei Gakuin University
NAKANO, Yoko, Kwansei Gakuin University
NORO, Tadashi, Aichi Gakuin University
SHIKI, Osato, Kwansei Gakuin University
KAZAI, Koji, Kwansei Gakuin University

Speakers
SK

Shuhei Kadota

Professor, Kwansei Gakuin University
MK

Mariko Kawasaki

Kwansei Gakuin University
HN

Hiroshi Nakanishi

Tohoku Gakuin University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

World of Reading Ltd: Weblab from Eli Publishing
Discover Eli's Weblab - a platform containing auto correcting multimedia exercises and tests graded according to the common european framework (A1 to C1). Open to teachers and students (students must be invited by teachers tough). We will also look at the free online resources for instructors who use other print products by Eli such as Réseaux and their 12 levels of readers in French, Spanish, German, Italian and English.

Exhibitors
avatar for World of Reading, Ltd.

World of Reading, Ltd.

President, World of Reading, Ltd.
Since 1989, World of Reading, Ltd. has offered the largest variety of Foreign Language and ESL materials - Software, DVDs, Audio CDs, Tshirts, Games and Books - over 100 languages – all at discounted prices, for ages 0-99. We have found great products for learning another language and for learning IN another language. Visit us online at www.wor.com – call or email for objective recommendations for YOUR needs.


Wednesday August 12, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

Language Centers and Living-Learning Communities
In this session, the presenter will share how an 18-year-old language resource center at a small, private liberal arts university moved from a stand-alone location to become integrated within a language living-learning community (residence hall). The presentation will summarize the brief history of the center, address challenges in a stand-alone location, and share the opportunities presented in the new residential space. Ideas for events, collaborations, staffing, and other resources with be shared. At the end of the session, participants will be able to identify three ways to update a language “lab” space, define “post-language lab era” and “living learning communities", and describe 2 benefits of open-learning spaces.

Speakers
BY

Bridget Yaden

Pacific Lutheran University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Jefferson 256 17 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

Online Community of Practice is the Solution: The Case of EFL Teachers in Taif University, Saudi Arabia
Meeting students’ various learning needs should be the ultimate goal of every English as a foreign language (EFL) teacher all over the world. This is why most of EFL teachers strive to keep abreast of the new trends of knowledge in their fields of teaching. However, it sounds it is not the case in some contexts like Saudi Arabian tertiary context where EFL teachers are not motivated enough to pursue their professional development (PD) because of the many responsibilities they have. These responsibilities include, but not limited to, heavy teaching loads, academic supervision, administrative coordination, and planning and conducting their own researches. Accordingly, EFL tertiary teachers in Saudi context are left with no opportunities to undertake PD programmes inside the walls of their tertiary institutions. Therefore, this presentation reports on a proposed model of training EFL tertiary teachers at Taif University, Saudi Arabia. The proposed model is in the form of online community of practice. The model draws on the utilization of some Web 2.0 applications and programmes such as Facebook, twitter, and blogs. The teachers will be able to share their experiences, thoughts, ideas, and best practices in teaching English to students majored in English at Taif University. The teachers will also have access to and reflect on the materials posted in Facebook, twitter, and blogs. It is hoped this model will be of a considerable benefit to the PD of EFL teachers at the Department of foreign Languages in Taif University. Implications for theory and practice are provided accordingly.

Keywords: EFL, Saudi Arabia, tertiary context, online community of practice, professional development, teacher education

Speakers
avatar for Naif Althobaiti

Naif Althobaiti

Taif University, Taif, Saudi Arabia


Wednesday August 12, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

An Avant-Garde Approach: Teaching English Using Stand-up Comedy
Have you ever wished that you could be both educational and mesmerizing at the same time? Ever struggled to interest students in class? Come to this once-in-a-lifetime presentation on using stand-up comedy to teach English, specifically tailored to intermediate-level ESL classes, where the presenter will demonstrate how he encourages active classroom participation and the production of speech. The presenter will leave you with the basics of how to build a joke and use any story to engage listeners. Prepare to laugh, prepare to learn!

Speakers
JZ

Jim Zvi

Hong Kong Polytechnic University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

Using Augmented Reality Based on 360-degree Video to Improve Second Language Learning for International Students
Augmented Reality(AR) is to augment real-world environment by overlapping the view of real environments with computer-generated media such as 3D virtual objects, videos, or GPS data. As an emerging technology, the application of AR in second language learning has been explored in recent years. Current studies on AR in second language learning mainly focus on the curriculum design. For example, some researchers use AR Glasses or mobile devices to project virtual objects and animation on a printed marker or 2D barcode for learning vocabulary or conversation.

However, those studies and applications fail to employ real-world environments as authentic language context and cultural elements to facilitate students’ language development. The main problem in these studies is that the emerging virtual objects and animation on the marker are irrelevant to the environment around the students, while according to sociocultural learning and situated learning theory, language context along with the culture of target language country are crucial for second language learning.

To bridge this gap, we propose a new learning model and AR technical solution based on 360-degree video and GPS techniques. A case study - Penn State Life, is being conducted to help the new international students of Penn State University get familiar with the scenarios along with the conversations on campus after their arrival. Students can download the App on their mobile devices. When they go to a location on campus where is detectable in GPS, a 360-degree video clip including conversation and subtitles will be activated according to the students’ GPS information. Then they can watch the overlapping-real-environment video on their mobile phones or even on immersive goggles like Google CardBoard to obtain more authentic experience. A follow-up mixed method research will be conducted to examine students’ improvement on second language performance and discover their experience.

Speakers
JL

Jian Liao

Learning, Design, & Technology, Colleage of Education, Penn State University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

3:30pm

4:00pm

Accuracy Rate Across Online Text-based Chat Room and Face-to-Face Tasks
Using online texting has become part of our daily communication method and using text-based chat room for language learning is not an exceptional platform to practice L2 inside and outside of the classroom. Recent research shows that inherent features of chat room better facilitate conditions for language interaction (Blake, 2000; Kitade, 2000). However little has yet been discovered on how beneficial it is for language learning using online text-based chat room when compared with face-to-face. This presentation will point out how recent research has conflicting results of what learners are noticing in their own errors through online tasks and present the research results of a study done by 127 students in Japan on accuracy rates and self-repair on three different cognitive tasks: personal, narration, and decision-making across online chat room and face-to-face. The data was analyzed by two way ANOVA. As a result, online text-based chat room tasks in personal and narration tasks had significantly higher accuracy than that of face-to-face. However, the number of self-initiated self-repair were higher for face-to-face. The finding suggests that the use of text-based chat room can facilitate accuracy compared to that of face-to-face and does not take advantage of the trade-off effect pointed out in Foster & Skehan (1996) for face-to-face.

The number of self-initiated self-repair did not relate with the accuracy rate result which could imply that chat logs do not show what the learners are actually producing and that covert self-initiated self-repair in the chat log needs to be taken into consideration to understand fully the learners’ output process (Smith, 2008). In light of the results, the use of online text-based platform could complement the accuracy of face-to-face tasks and potential differences of self-initiated self-repair across online text-based chat and face-to-face could be taken into consideration when implementing the tasks.

Speakers
NT

Nami Takase

Shizuoka University Arts and Culture


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

4:00pm

Possibility of Oral Skills Development Perceived in the Discourse of Online EFL Students
This study investigated if the distance English language learners’ discourse supports the oral development of a foreign language in traditional face-to-face teaching context, or if it opposes the traditional paradigm, and supports the development of oral skills in virtual distance learning environments. A Critical Discourse Analysis was conducted to study the postings of four students in an online forum in which they discussed the oral skill development in a distance English language learning context. The analysis regarded the experiential, relational and expressive values exemplified by the students' lexical and grammatical choices. It was concluded that their discourse oscillated between the preference for face-to-face contexts for language learning and the acknowledgement of the opportunities that new technology communication tools bring to distance learning. Face-to-face teaching allows for more interaction. However, technology communication tools help overcome geographic barriers for study by providing them the use of authentic language without leaving their hometowns.

Speakers
avatar for Joao Tobias Lima Sales

Joao Tobias Lima Sales

Professor and Coordinator, Universidade Estadual do Ceará


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Barker 024 (McFadden) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

4:00pm

The Effect of Computer-Assisted Oral Reading While Listening on the Development of Listening and Speaking Proficiency
The need to acquire English listening and speaking skills is increasing in Japan; however, in EFL contexts such as Japan where access to English input and opportunities to produce output is limited, becoming a skilled English speaker is challenging. One way to improve students’ listening to and speaking proficiency is oral reading while listening, an approach that connects the written and spoken language. It has been found to improve L2 learners’ English pronunciation, listening skills, and oral reading fluency. Recently computer software that allows learners to listen to an mp3 file while recording their voice is widely used in universities in Japan. Although this software makes intensive oral reading while listening practice possible, little research involving the software has been conducted. This study is an examination of the effects having Japanese EFL university students engage in computer-assisted oral reading while listening. The students’ L2 listening proficiency was measured with a dictation test and L2 oral reading fluency was measured by speech rate, mean length of fluent runs between pauses, number of pauses per minute, and rater judgment. In addition, interviews were conducted to investigate changes in the way the students listen to and orally read English. The statistical analysis showed significant improvements in L2 listening ability and oral reading fluency. The interviews revealed that when listening the learners began to listen to chunks rather than single words, and when engaged in oral reading, they began to pause between thought groups and to link words. Computer-assisted oral reading while listening provides students with opportunities to carefully listen to and produce English. The results of this study support the usefulness of oral reading while listening as a way to improve L2 listening and speaking.

Speakers
SS

Satoko Suzuki

Temple University, Japan Campus


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:00pm - 4:25pm
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

4:00pm

Goethe-Institut: The Digital Classroom
Tablets are gaining currency for their application in the classroom. Recent research findings show the use of tablets in foreign language lessons to be as beneficial as collaborative and project-based learning. Tablets have demonstrated particular potential in the areas of speaking and listening; social networks and online communities enable students to work directly with authentic material in the target language, while rote-based learning has been replaced with the interactive sharing, presentation, and discussion of sophisticated multimedia projects. Even the role of teachers has been transformed: no longer confined by limited learning materials, teachers have the chance to place a greater emphasis on guidance, mentoring, and feedback for their students. Together, tablets give students the opportunity to access a vastly greater amount of material while taking learning into their own hands. 


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:00pm - 4:25pm
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

4:00pm

Putting the pieces together: An instructional technology toolkit for facilitating lifelong language learning
Facilitating lifelong language learning amongst students is a frequently mentioned goal of many language teachers. We want our students to fall in love with the cultures and languages we have dedicated our lives to studying. However, igniting the spark for learning beyond our classrooms can be a real challenge. In our current educational culture where motivation for learning is too often focused on extrinsic motivations like passing tests and making good grades, how do we redirect students toward intrinsic motivations like a love for learning?

Research into various fields of study has provided evidence that it typically takes about ten years to master most skills. From this premise it stands to reason that in order for language learners to reach higher levels of language proficiency, there is a need to promote learner autonomy that extends learning beyond the classes language students take in schools.

Facilitating learner autonomy requires a reconceptualization of the way language classes are structured. Building upon goal theories, task-based language learning, and deep reflection within a transparent learning framework can help to provide students with the skills to continue learning beyond the classroom. This framework can set students on a more self-directed path toward language learning that is both intrinsically motivating and engaging.

Throughout my own research and practice I have begun to develop an instructional technology toolkit to facilitate this type of learning environment for my students. In this session I will share my own successes and challenges as I continually work to help my own students become more autonomous on their lifelong language learning journeys. Participants will leave with concrete examples and tools to explore in their own future research and practice.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Romjue

Amanda Romjue

Language Lab Director, Appalachian State University



Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

4:00pm

CANCELLED A Stochastic Learning Approach for English Countability Prediction
This session has been cancelled.  Some nouns can be treated as countable and uncountable depending on contexts. However, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish them for novice english learners, especially for learners of ESL. This study applies Machine Learning techniques to make it clear when nouns should be treated as countable and when should not. A stochastic learning model like a well-known Bayesian Network is used for the purpose. It is trained to estimate the probability of simultaneous appearance of countable/uncountable nouns with other words. Native english texts taken from British National Corpus are converted into Latent Semantic Index (LSI) vectors with part-of-speech tags and used to train the model. A LSI is an indexing number of words, which becomes same when the different words are used in same or similar contexts and consequently thought as having same or similar meaning. Thus, LSI vectors make the word space compact and reduce ambiguity. Results will show the high probability in some combinations of specific type of words, in other words, the probability becomes high in some contexts. Which means that it is easy to determine whether nouns should be treated as countable or uncountable in the contexts. Contrarily, the low probability means difficult to determine. The information is useful for both teachers and students. Furthermore, the trained model can be applied to machine translation systems. There are several related works. Baldwin and Bold have proposed a clustering method to estimate countability from corpus data in 2003. Nagata et. al. have proposed a method to determine countability of nouns according to their contexts in 2006. However, they used deterministic models and could not estimate the probability of countability. We think the probability is important to know how the context is difficult to determine countability which can be used to teach and learn english.

Speakers
JT

Junko Tanaka

Kobe University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:00pm - 4:25pm
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

4:00pm

Adding to Your Digital Toolbox: Technology Skills Every Foreign Language Instructor Should Have
Technology skills are vital in our ever-increasingly digital environment. Whether you are a graduate student heading out on the job market or a tenured faculty member, it is crucial for instructors to have a basic technology foundation in order to engage their students, reach new audiences, and simplify their work. This presentation will highlight key technology skills every foreign language instructor should have (e.g., create and edit digital audio; establish a web presence or digital portfolio; rip audio and video files from discs; transform existing, authentic resources for pedagogical purposes; etc.) and will provide examples of the best tools to use.

This presentation will highlight several skills, including the ability to: create and edit digital audio; perform basic image editing; rip MP3s from audio CDs; create video clips from DVDs; copy a CD or DVD; establish a web presence or digital portfolio (without knowing HTML or CSS); convert a variety of files; collaborate with students and colleagues in synchronous environments; discover rich resources and curate or share them; and download and manipulate exiting web-based content.

Some examples of tools (which are subject to change as new tools are developed and released) that will be covered include: Audacity, Pixlr, Flash and Video Downloader (browser extension), ImgBurn, Weebly, Jumpshare, Feedly, Pocket, VLC, etc.

Speakers
KC

Keah Cunningham

University of Kansas


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:00pm - 4:25pm
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

4:00pm

Recapturing the 'Lost C': Creating Communities and Common Bonds Within and Beyond the L2 Classroom
As language educators today, many of us face the same issues: how can we keep student interest and motivation alive past the first or second semester of language study? How do we provide a positive balance to the negative effects of a language requirement? What can we do to encourage student investment and engagement? Perhaps the answer to many of these issues lies in the most humble of ACTFL’s Five C’s of Language Learning, the 5th C (which is sometimes referred to as the “Lost C”): Communities. This paper begins with a discussion of the Communities Goal (which often seen as least important by many educators, yet is highly prioritized by post-secondary students) as it relates to the foreign language classroom. Following a discussion of different definitions of the term community, this article describes a community-building project carried out in a third-semester Italian class at Bucknell University. The project combined spoken and written language practice in the target language and involved in-class activities, independent work, and contact with students’ relatives. The goal of the project was to foster a sense of shared bonds and community within the classroom by focusing on students’ Italian heritage as well as a connection with Italy today. Technology played a role in this project as students were encouraged to communicate in the target language with friends and relatives in Italy using Skype. This project provides a model for successful in-class community building activities through a meaningful, content-based project, which can be adapted to a variety of foreign language classrooms.

Speakers
LP

Lisa Perrone

Bucknell University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

4:35pm

L2 as Computer Operational Language: Incidental Vocabulary Acquisition Through Computer Tasks Unrelated to Language Learning
Incidental vocabulary acquisition has often been defined as “the learning of one thing, e.g. vocabulary, when the learner’s primary objective is to do something else, e.g. to communicate” (Laufer and Hulstijn 2014: 10). Given this definition, how will vocabulary be acquired when the primary objective is not to communicate, or not even related to language at all? For example, a learner wants to upload pictures to Facebook, but all the toolbars and menus on his computer are in Russian. Will he acquire Russian vocabulary as he completes his non-communicative task?

Frequency also plays an important role in learning vocabulary. Today’s learners are considered very technologically savvy and use computers constantly in their everyday life. If these computers are set to a foreign language, we can conclude that this heavy usage will promote digital literacy in the L2 and force students to be more independent and motivated learners, thus increasing learner autonomy. Moreover, once a computer’s operational language has been changed, most programs will automatically switch into this language; thus Safari will display Google Maps in the L2, iTunes will organize music according to the L2’s alphabet (i.e. Cyrillic versus Latin), and using Skype will give a new perspective on “international” communication. Social media, whether it’s Facebook or a “local” alternative (such as Russia’s VKontakte), can also be set to the L2, if it doesn’t automatically switch once the operational language has been changed. Using social media in the L2 will promote learner autonomy, and can provide motivation for extending traditional learning practices.

This paper explores the theory behind incidental vocabulary acquisition and how it interacts with technology to expand today’s classrooms and learning environments into a more learner-centered, autonomous process. It also examines the possibilities for other learner achievements associated with changing a computer’s operational language to the L2.

Speakers
MG

Margaret Godwin-Jones

Pyatigorsk State Linguistic University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:35pm - 5:00pm
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

4:35pm

The Effect of Task Type on Learners' Interaction in an Online Chinese Class
The rapid development of technologies has enabled language learners to interact with peers and instructors orally and visually via web conferencing tools at a distance. These new contexts for learning impact on learners’ language use and on the learning process more generally. The present study, which has a non-experimental research design, investigates learners’ interaction in an online beginners’ Chinese class implementing the use of a web conferencing tool and a task-based teaching (TBL) approach.

Previous research has shown that task type has a significant influence on learners’ interaction. However, much of the current literature is limited to the quantitative analysis of negotiation of meaning incidence in learners’ interaction. There is still little empirical research qualitatively investigating the effect of task type on learners’ meaning negotiation pattern in a synchronous computer-medicated communication (SCMC) context.

In the second semester, 2013, 14 beginning learners of Chinese participated in this study. Five fortnightly one-hour online sessions were conducted, which included two jigsaw tasks, two decision-making tasks and one information-gap task. Varonis and Gass’s (1985) model of modified interaction were employed to examine meaning negotiation between the interlocutors. Interviews, teacher observation journals, pre- and post-session survey were conducted to gain an in-depth understanding of learners’ thoughts about the tasks and learning experience. The findings indicate task type has an effect on learners’ meaning negotiation routines and has a positive impact on facilitating learners’ collaborative learning.

Speakers
SG

Sijia Guo

Macquarie University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:35pm - 5:00pm
Barker 024 (McFadden) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

4:35pm

Voxy: Evaluating the Impact of Mobile-Assisted Language Learning (MALL) on Learner Engagement
E-learning emerged in order to meet learner and institutional needs, providing accessible, customized, and convenient learning materials. However, many e-learning products have been plagued by severe attrition rates (Nielson, 2011) despite initial participant enthusiasm. Voxy, a language learning web- and mobile-based product, was designed within the Task-Based Language Teaching (TBLT) framework to provide English language learners with authentic, relevant content in conjunction with synchronous online instruction (available only on Web), in order to create a product that fosters engagement, while being maximally effective. Learners have access to self-study materials designed to promote the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, as well as synchronous private and group sessions that provide the speaking practice crucial to language acquisition.

While initial research has shown that this combination of synchronous and autonomous language instruction is effective and engaging (Jee & O’Connor, 2014), it would be worthwhile to explore the impact of mobile-assisted language learning (MALL) on learner engagement. Early research into how learners interact with Voxy’s mobile application has revealed that those who access it on their mobile devices are far more engaged with the language learning activities than the average Voxy learner. The presentation will review and discuss these findings, as well as explore the additional ways learner engagement could be increased through MALL.

Exhibitors
avatar for Rebecca Y. Jee

Rebecca Y. Jee

Senior Research & Assessment Associate, Voxy


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:35pm - 5:00pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

4:35pm

A National Survey of Basic Online Language Learning
In 2014, I surveyed the current state of post-secondary basic online language education in the USA. The results provide data on this nascent field where heretofore there has been little. With a feedback rate of close to 25% and a relatively low sampling bias, the survey elicited information on :

(1) Basic institutional information;

(2) A matrix of courses with drill down information on enrollments and student success;

(3) Design and development of courses and materials choices;

(4) Teaching modes, practices and training;

(5) Student preparation, assessment, and reasons for success.

In this presentation, I will discuss the survey, its 2013-2014 results and a preview of the 2014-2015 results.

Speakers
avatar for Kathryn Murphy-Judy

Kathryn Murphy-Judy

Assoc. Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:35pm - 5:00pm
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

4:35pm

Bridging The Gap: Technophobia and Community Dynamics
Technobobia is often associated with generations of “digital immigrants” (Pensky 2001) but also serves as an important meter as to the dynamics of the range of technological relationships within a learning community (Selwyn 2008). Establishing a functional identity in diverse learning community presents a challenge in an ever-changing technological environment but the lack thereof can reduce teaching effectiveness. Applying generalized ecological theory related to community dynamic (Ricklefs 2008; Whittaker 1962; Baselga and Araújo 2010; Didhama et al. 2005; Wang et al. 2015) to issues facing the language and culture learning community offers a framework upon which we can begin to bridge the generational and cultural divide between the educators and students starting with the way that we value existing resources. Among the most valued resources in learning communities are the experienced educators who vary greatly in their comfort level with changing technology. Practical theoretical extrapolations would be (1) relating varying technological capabilities to the correlation between biodiversity and the success of an ecological community so as to emphasize the need to adapt technology to the capability of the constituents; (2) optimizing the effectiveness of all available resources by keeping older technologies on hand and ensuring that new technologies enhance the valuable knowledge and experience of seasoned faculty members without compromising the connection to the past; (3) buffering drastic (and potentially distracting) pedagogical transitions by facilitating gradual or phase-based integrations for new technological systems and offering personalized training that caters to the capability and needs of constituents; (4) ensure sustainable benefits of new technology by patiently encouraging to educators who are hesitant or resistant to new technologies. Essentially, effectiveness of teaching methods will always be most closely related to an educator’s ability to connect with their students in their own teaching style and therefore creative and ecologically-inspired approaches to addressing technophobia will allow language and culture learning communities to maintain the important balance between the past and present and continue to thrive in the future.

Speakers
AR

Audrey R. Zarb

Foreign Language Technology Center, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:35pm - 5:00pm
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

4:35pm

P-CHECK: A New Plug-in for Peer Pronunciation Feedback
Despite advances in computer-assisted pronunciation training (Neri, Cucchiarini, Strik, & Boves, 2002; Tsurutani et al., 2006), learners continue to rely heavily on instructors for individualized pronunciation feedback, both during speech production and asynchronously. However, providing delayed feedback on learners’ digital recordings is arduous, and it can be difficult to determine the level and focus of feedback required. Peer feedback on intelligibility (whether an utterance is understood) rather than comprehensibility or accentedness (Derwing & Munro, 2005) may provide a way to overcome these drawbacks while promoting learners’ sensitivity to their own production and encouraging learner autonomy.

To test this hypothesis, the presenters developed P-CHECK, a plug-in for Glexa, a proprietary LMS by Version2 (http://ver2.jp). This plug-in facilitates peer-sourced pronunciation feedback to be given after explicit pronunciation instruction by the instructor. The instructor inputs two written “minimal pair sentences” that contain the targeted phonemic or suprasegmental contrast. P-CHECK presents the learner with one of those sentences onscreen for the learner to record. P-CHECK delivers this recording randomly to the learner’s peers, along with both original written sentences. The peers listen and select the sentence they hear, i.e. the sentence they believe the speaker recorded. P-CHECK sends the accumulated feedback to the learner to use in identifying his/her level of intelligibility.

Peer feedback in other skill areas has been fruitful; yet little is known about its effectiveness in developing pronunciation skills or awareness, especially for EFL learners sharing the same L1. The presenters explain the pedagogic rationale for P-CHECK, introduce its structure and interface, and discuss the results of a pilot study on P-CHECK use, learners’ self-regulatory capacity (Tseng, Dornyei & Schmitt, 2006), and production of selected phonetic features. For life-long pronunciation improvement, reasonably accurate self-monitoring is ultimately needed (Dlaska & Krekeler, 2008), and P-CHECK should take learners closer to developing that ability.

Speakers
avatar for Yukie Ueno

Yukie Ueno

Professor, Hokkai-Gakuen University
intrested in pronunciatio practice, CALL, Earner Corpus
avatar for Suzanne M. Yonesaka

Suzanne M. Yonesaka

Hokkai-Gakuen University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:35pm - 5:00pm
CGIS South S050 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

4:35pm

Using VLC Streaming for Spanish Classes
Foreign language labs often purchase digital lab hardware and software to facilitate interactive language teaching. From Tandberg to Sanako, the tools and activities of digital labs are an integral part of teaching foreign languages. The basic functionalities of digital labs, such as talking to students, monitoring students, playing video clips and recording student audio, are commonly used in teaching activities. After our lab had to retire Sanako lab due to aging equipment, we have not bought any new programs due to budget cuts. To meet teaching needs, we have replaced our old systems with an open-source program called VLC media player.

VLC is a simple, fast and powerful cross-platform media player. It is easily downloaded online and installed in individual student stations. Using VLC, we can stream DVD movies, video clips in m4v format, mp3 files, and live voices. All of this is done without a server. A teacher station can control streaming that all the student stations receive in their individual stations.

In our two years using VLC, learning outcomes have been successful. In Fall 2014, the our lab worked closely with Spanish Lecturer Rossana Chion who was using the textbook “Cultura y cine: Hispanoamerica hoy” for Spanish 215.

Before watching Spanish-language movies, Lecturer Chion prepares students by providing vocabulary, background information, political context, and historical information. During the streaming, Lecturer Chion is able to stop the movie whenever it is necessary to explain or point out important details. Students are required to answer questions during or after watching the movie.

These movies expand students’ understanding of culture and politics in Spanish-speaking countries, and they showcase vocabulary in real-life contexts. As a result, students are motivated to attend class. Movies make the lessons engaging, but VLC allows a movie-based lesson to be interactive through engaging discussion.

Speakers
RC

Rossana Chion

San Francisco State University


Wednesday August 12, 2015 4:35pm - 5:00pm
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

6:15pm

Duck Tour
Come QUACK a smile with your fellow FLEAT peers as you see the sights of Boston. The Boston Duck tour (www.bostonducktours.com/) is an 80-minute land and water tour -in a brightly painted amphibious vehicle- of Boston's most famous landmarks. The very personable (sometimes outrageous) conDUCKtors give a nonstop lively stream of patter throughout the tour. Headsets are available in Cantonese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Portuguese (Brazil), and Spanish. We recommend these headsets (no extra charge) for our international visitors even if your English is very strong. These conDUCKtors intentionally speak a very quick variety of Boston dialect which is sometimes difficult to follow even for native speakers of English!

Wednesday August 12, 2015 6:15pm - 8:00pm
Off site
 
Thursday, August 13
 

8:00am

8:00am

9:00am

Henderson Plenary: From Local to Global: Virtual Pedagogies for Intercultural Competence Development
From Local to Global: Virtual Pedagogies for Intercultural Competence Development.  Our increasingly diverse community necessitates intercultural competence development. Broadly defined, intercultural competence refers to the “effective management of interaction between people who, to some degree or another, represent different or divergent affective, cognitive, and behavioral orientations to the world” (Spitzberg & Changnon, 2009, p. 7). Hence, cognizance and implementation of specific linguistic and cultural tools in a variety of contexts are key components of intercultural competence. Lack of intercultural competence has resulted in negative consequences in numerous settings, including health care (Gregg & Saha, 2007; Perry & Southwell, 2011) and legal contexts (Eades, 2008; Hornberger, 1998). Thus, intercultural competence is an essential skill that can be developed as a life-long learning element beginning in the formative years. Both external (e.g., social environment) and internal stimuli (e.g., motivation) influence an individual’s intercultural competence development. Moreover, learners’ attention is affected by external and internal stimuli. Attention can be loosely referred to as a continuous process in the brain that entails interaction between the learner and environment (Schuchert, 2004). Virtual pedagogies that direct learners’ attention to their roles in local and global communities can enhance intercultural competence development.

Accordingly, this presentation addresses the following three primary areas: 1) virtual spaces and the role of attention in intercultural competence development, 2) global examples of virtual pedagogies drawing upon Japan’s utilization of synchronous tools to increase learners’ attention (Jung, 2008), Brazil’s innovative approaches to break the inequitable digital divide using mobile and online platforms (Mota & Scott, 2014), and Zimbabwe’s dual models of distance education (Aina, 2008), and 3) innovative asynchronous and synchronous samples of the author’s undergraduate online introductory language courses with an intercultural competence development framework. A Bring Your Own ideas (BYOi) collaborative activity will allow attendees to co-create an interactive virtual learning space that enhances learners’ intercultural competence skill development.

Speakers
avatar for Christine E. Poteau

Christine E. Poteau

Assistant Professor of Spanish and Coordinator of the World Languages Program, Alvernia University
Growing up in a multicultural family, my immersive experiences in Brazilian Portuguese and Ukrainian inspired me to pursue graduate studies in Spanish Applied Linguistics at Temple University (Philadelphia, PA). Currently, I am an Assistant Professor of Spanish and the World Languages Program Coordinator at Alvernia University (Reading, PA). I also serve as U.S. liaison to linguistics for the International Higher Education Teaching and Learning... Read More →


Thursday August 13, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Sanders Theatre

10:00am

10:30am

IALLT Annual Business Meeting
Join us for the awards ceremony, short report from the president, announcement of our new officers and next conference location, and an open forum. Open to all conference attendees.

Thursday August 13, 2015 10:30am - 11:30am
Sanders Theatre

11:30am

1:00pm

Medical Students' Perceptions on Mobile Learning Content for Building Up Medical Terminology
English is becoming increasingly important for Japanese Medical students preparing for a future career as a doctor or researcher. In order to give these students more opportunities to build up medical English terminology, one of the most important parts of their English study, the authors started to design a range of self-study quizzes to deliver to students’ mobile devices, which are expected to be a useful tool for enhancing their autonomous study (Bakay, Bulut & Delialioglu, 2013). The authors conducted a needs analysis in June 2013 to investigate their students’ needs and preferences for using mobile devices for English study and the results showed that their expectations towards mobile learning were very high (Iwata, Tamaki, Shudong, Telloyan, Ajiki, Clayton, 2014). Two hundred forty-two students signed up for a subscription of this mobile learning content and each content was delivered to them twice a week from July 2013 to January 2014. The survey conducted on the students’ perceptions of the content revealed that half of them found the content useful for their medical English study and about two-thirds of them found the content level to be appropriate. However, the data analysis revealed that the students’ actual use of the content was at a low level of 9.5% on average, which illustrated that students’ readiness for mobile learning was still low while their expectations of mobile learning were high. These results left us two challenges to solve. Firstly, we need to modify the content and delivery system to better suit students’ needs and preferences. Secondly, we need to investigate what factors affect learners’ motivation and autonomy in a mobile learning context and seek ways to increase student’s motivation for mobile learning.

Speakers
JI

Jun Iwata

Shimane University


Thursday August 13, 2015 1:00pm - 1:25pm
CGIS South S050 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

1:00pm

Mango Languages: Integrating technology resources into language instruction
This presentation examines the role of technology in higher education language instruction. While classroom technology integration grows, so does the amount of supplemental language learning software options for students and faculty. This presentation will explore the process of adapting second language acquisition theories to digital learning experiences, how technology solutions can compliment classroom instruction, and how including software solutions in language instruction can increase student engagement, language retention, and improve post-graduation employment opportunities.

Exhibitors
IK

Iryna Kulchytska

Mango Languages
avatar for Ryan Lucia

Ryan Lucia

Mango Languages


Thursday August 13, 2015 1:00pm - 1:25pm
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

1:00pm

Educational Chat for Reflection and Identity Transformation: English Pre-service Brazilian Teacher Education in the University
The education of a language professional, as well as any professional, takes place through his/her engagement in unfamiliar discursive communities, at the beginning, while transforms and consolidates new communicative repertoires, which are required for participation (MATÊNCIO, 2008; LAVE; WENGER, 1991). Moreover, to engage in language practices of a building community, the future professional (re) builds his/her identity as a member of a particular human social sphere. In fact, the learning of new digital language practices is followed by the learning of new ways of acting socially in the world (BRONCKART, 2008; CRISTOVÃO, 2010). Building on the above, we aim at investigating the participation of pre-service teachers from third and first years of an English Language undergraduate degree in an educational chat, and the reflection promoted (or not) by the use of this digital genre as a consequence of his/her process of identity building in a social community. This investigation is based on the assumption that the activity of situated reflection (CONTRERAS, 2002; ZEICHNER, 1994) can be one of the tools for educating teachers committed to their practices and capable of making decisions by assessing their professional contexts. Further, we bear our analysis on the assumption that the interaction promoted by the educational chat has its own characteristics based on the centrality of writing in that genre, as well as particular conditions of production in that digital media (GERALDINI, 2005; HILGERT, 2000). Furthermore, it promotes a joint learning with the involvement of both cognitive and affective aspects of the participants. The data analyzed are part of a joint research developed by researchers from two state universities. The results show that the use of educational chats can be adequate to situations in which pre-service teachers have their voices heard and break asymmetry patterns between teacher educators and pre-service teachers through the use of a digital tool for identity constitution.

Speakers
ES

Eliane Segati Rios-Registro

Northern Parana State University


Thursday August 13, 2015 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

1:00pm

Loving Languages
I am a primary school teacher in Doncaster, England as well as British Council Ambassador for education and I would like to talk about a project that has started in July 2014. I have been coordinating an etwinning project which was set up to celebrate languages from within my school to across the globe. The basic concept, was for students from across Europe to post simple video introductions of themselves before counting from 0 - 10 in whatever languages they speak in. Nothing more than a simple 30 - 60 second clip to allow students to have a voice in explaining who they are without putting them under pressure. Presently, we have 75 partner schools and a large collection of videos with pupils of all ages from Armenia to Ireland, Greece to Spain sharing a vast range of languages. Arabic, Amazigh, Urdu, Czech and many other languages being heard and applauded instead of derided and shunned which can happen all too frequently in some areas. With the help of these schools and their pupils we have exchanged some incredibly positive videos that show children talking in 1, 2 or 3 different languages and making other people step back and instead of labelling them as being different, praise them for being talented. Understandably, our pupils want to listen to, learn from and collaborate with these friends because they want to find out more, understand more and know more. This project has enabled us to bring down barriers and open up some eyes and minds and I would like to share how we have done that, but I would also to ask for your help in spreading the message even further so that instead of 75 partner schools, we have 175 partner schools and hundreds of languages represented and celebrated.

Speakers
PC

Patrick Carroll

Shaw Wood Academy


Thursday August 13, 2015 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

1:00pm

Personalizing Language Learning through Technology-based Tools
Campus internationalization efforts and the needs of the global economy have created new audiences for language instruction, but these new learners often have highly personal goals and become impatient with standard curricula. They may need to be able to use a language to do research in a specific discipline or acquire proficiency in a language not available on their campus. Technology offers a wealth of resources to personalize language learning, but language learners often do not know how to evaluate and use these resources. They may also be unaware of technology-based tools to document and assess their progress effectively.

Using examples from a program designed for independent learners, this presentation demonstrates how learners can be taught to engineer learning experiences to meet their own learning goals that incorporate technology as both resource and learning platform. They learn to define objectives, create tasks to meet these objectives, use social networking tools like NIng and Diigo to collaborate with other independent learners, and assemble e-portfolios to document and assess their progress. They also learn to consider the relationship between language and culture.

Based on the positive reaction of learners to this method of language learning, the presenter argues that teaching students to design technology-based tasks can help language programs address the personal goals of today’s learners. The presentation concludes with suggestions for incorporating this instruction across various levels of instruction and considers how to meet needs for faculty development and technology support.

Speakers
SS

Sharon Scinicariello

University of Richmond


Thursday August 13, 2015 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

1:00pm

Pronunciation Teaching Using Automatic Speech Recognition
Despite evidence showing the importance language learners place on pronunciation, recent studies point to numerous deficiencies in contemporary and non-technology based pronunciation curricula, materials, and methodologies (Hismanoglu and Hismanoglu, 2010). The success of computer assisted language learning (CALL) programs on learner development has inspired researchers to explore the possible positive outcomes of using computers to provide feedback for pronunciation. However, investigations into the use of automatic speech recognition technology (ASR) have privileged suprasegmentals or individual phonemes with little or no focus on indirect feedback based on overall intelligible speech (Cucchiarini, Neri, & Strik 2009, Ge, Sharma, & Smith 2013, Wang, Chen, Li & Meng 2012). Moreover, research on the possible benefits of indirect pronunciation feedback that ASR technologies provide to learners while completing real-world and communicative activities is lacking. In response to this gap in the research, this study explores students’ perceptions of the pedagogical implementation of ASR technology in teaching French pronunciation with a communicative and task-based approach. Specifically, this study examines introductory-level French students’ use of Google’s Dictation application and Search by Voice internet browsing, and Apple’s Siri, as each program provides speakers with indirect pronunciation feedback in the form of a textual representation of speech. In conjunction with the pronunciation activities in the course textbook, which focus on individual phonemes using minimal pairs, students in this study complete various communicative activities using a computer, iPad, or iPhone. Half of the participants use Google Dictation and Search by Voice and the other half use Siri to create and send voicemail messages and browse the internet for information on French celebrities and apartment rentals in Montreal. Data sources to be presented include student questionnaire responses regarding perceptions of the technology administered before and after their use as well as research journal entries completed by the teacher-researcher.

Speakers
AD

Adrion Dula

Wayne State University


Thursday August 13, 2015 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Jefferson 256 17 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA

1:00pm

IALLT Language Center Management
Are you a new language center director? Are you struggling to understand how to manage the multiple needs of faculty and students in a changing world of instant media and communications? How do you balance budgets, staffing, faculty support, technology training, public relations and copyright issues? This workshop will provide insights on all facets of managing a language center. Attendees can bring their questions to a panel of experts, who will both present and discuss the many burning issues center directors and managers face every day.


Speakers
avatar for Julie Evershed

Julie Evershed

Director, Language Resource Center, University of Michigan
avatar for Betty Rose Facer

Betty Rose Facer

Old Dominion University
JF

Judi Franz

University of California - Irvine
avatar for Harold H Hendricks

Harold H Hendricks

Supervisor, Humanities Learning Resources, Brigham Young University
Computer Assisted Instruction since 1973; interactive video since 1980's; learning center management since 1991; diagnostic language testing, digital video streaming, pronunciation applications.
ML

Mike Ledgerwood

Samford University
BY

Bridget Yaden

Pacific Lutheran University


Thursday August 13, 2015 1:00pm - 3:00pm
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

1:35pm

Technology Enhanced Emotion Expression Learning
Appropriate lexical use is one daunting task for many language learners even though they have a wide range of vocabulary. It is particularly true when they express their emotions. With inadequate command of emotion words, learners tend to use common emotion words (e.g., “angry” or “happy”) to describe their feelings. Sometimes, they attempt to use alternative words; they would consult thesauri for synonyms lookup. However, the synonyms thesauri suggest are typically listed in alphabetical order and short of contextual information, which seem unable to help learners tell the nuanced emotion words. As a result, the synonyms learners choose are very likely to fail to fit the scenarios they would like to describe. Bearing this in mind, we utilized machine learning technique to develop an emotion wording assistance system, RESOLVE to help learners with their emotional expressions. More specifically, the system suggests appropriate synonymous emotion words which are ranked based on learners’ contexts. In addition, the corresponding usage information involving the description of the usage scenarios, definitions and example sentences is also provided. Such information aims to facilitate learners’ clear description of their emotions.

To evaluate the effectiveness of the RESOLVE system, we carried out an experiment with 36 EFL college students in an Asian country. We compared their writing tasks in the pre- and post-tests to examine the appropriateness of emotion wording and the difficulty of emotion words students achieved. Two native English speaker judges were involved to evaluate students’ performance. The results showed that with the help of RESOLVE, all students achieved substantial improvements in appropriate emotion wording (i.e., the average scores increased from 56.6 to 88.3 out of 100.0). Importantly, the less proficient gained more benefit from RESOLVE than high proficient ones (the respective error reduction rates are 76.2% and 49.0%). On the other hand, the difficulty level of emotion words students used also increased from 51.5% to 67.7%, inferring that students had a better command of emotion words. In addition, students’ attitudes toward RESOLVE were predominantly positive.

Speakers
avatar for Mei-Hua, Chen

Mei-Hua, Chen

assistant professor, Tunghai University


Thursday August 13, 2015 1:35pm - 2:00pm
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

1:35pm

The Investigation of the Relation Between Online Case Analyses and Collegial EFL Part-time Faculty's Reflection
This study proposes to investigate how and whether the utilization of five-step case analysis procedure in online community trigger reflection of collegial English as Foreign Language part-time teachers. Higher education today has been challenged by the rising reliance on part-time faculty. Nevertheless, several studies have indicated a great number of part-time instructors who have had limited training in classroom instruction and curriculum development. Although researchers have suggested that part-time teachers should be offered the same professional development opportunities as full-time faculty, limited studies and resources have been contributed specifically to the integration of part timers into the education community. Thus, the study purports to draw upon McNergney’s five-step case analysis approach in an online community for part-time teachers to reflect upon issues of cases and share their reflections with other teachers. Due to the fact that teacher reflection plays a key role of ameliorating instructional quality, McNergney’s case analysis approach is employed as a framework for triggering participants’ reflection. Eight part-time EFL teachers and two full-time faculty members from a private college in Taiwan will consist of the participant pool. Multiple data collection methods including online discussion, messages, case analyses, interviews, and online reflection will be employed to investigate part-time faculty’s perspectives of reflecting on cases in online community.

Speakers
avatar for Token, Lee

Token, Lee

Hua Fan University



Thursday August 13, 2015 1:35pm - 2:00pm
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

1:35pm

Rosetta Stone: Higher Education's Newest Partner in Language Learning
Long known for its ubiquitous yellow boxes, Rosetta Stone has evolved its product and service offering to now serve colleges and universities through a robust suite of online language learning products. The company's Director of Higher Education, Christophe Pralong, will walk attendees through how Rosetta Stone partners with higher ed institutions across the U.S. and world - including in his native France - to deliver a completely different type of service than what probably comes to mind when you think of Rosetta Stone. 

Exhibitors

Thursday August 13, 2015 1:35pm - 2:00pm
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

1:35pm

Assessing the Probability for a Noun to be Countable
It is difficult for ESL learners to discern if a noun is countable or not and in what context. This study applies Machine Learning techniques and tries to make it clear in what conditions nouns should be treated as countable or not.

A stochastic learning model like a well-known Bayesian Network is used for the purpose. The model is trained to estimate the probability of simultaneous appearance of countable/uncountable nouns with other non-target words.

Native English texts taken from a corpus are converted into Latent Semantic Index (LSI) vectors with part-of-speech tags and used to train the model. An LSI is an indexing number of words, which becomes the same when words are used in same or similar contexts and consequently have the same or similar meaning. Thus, LSI vectors make the word space compact and reduce ambiguity. The results will be shown as a probability in which nouns should be treated as countable or uncountable in the contexts under examination. The high probability means it is easy to determine whether nouns should be treated as countable or uncountable in the contexts. On the contrary, the low probability means it is difficult to determine.

Such information would be useful for both teachers and students of ESL. Furthermore, the trained model can be applied to machine translation systems. There are several related works in the field. Baldwin and Bold (2003) have proposed a clustering method to estimate countability from corpus data. Nagata et al. (2006) have proposed a method to determine countability of nouns. However, they used deterministic models and could not estimate the probability of countability.

We believe the probability is important to determine what kind of context is difficult for ESL students to discern countability and what contexts should be used in teaching and learning noun countability.

Speakers

Thursday August 13, 2015 1:35pm - 2:00pm
CGIS South S050 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

1:35pm

Digital Technologies for Language Learning in a Brazilian University: An Analysis of the Production of Tutorials
Concerning the use of technology for empowerment of students for agency and for triggering digital literate identities and practices (Rowsell, Burke, 2009; Street, Pahl, Rowsell, 2009; Lankshear; Knobel, 2011) the intervention in the university has become a fertile ground for social changes. In Brazil, the use of digital technologies seems to be spreading through different socio-economical classes and the access to internet has increased 50% from 2003 to 2013, according to IBOPE media - IBOPE is the leading private company dealing with research in Latin America. Despite this information, it is mandatory to keep in mind that in developing countries, such as Brazil, there is still a great number of young people, which do not have access to Internet connection and computer at their homes (CGI, 2011). Considering this scenario, we believe that it is the university social role to promote opportunities to assuage this lack of access, and propose meaningful ways of using this access to personal/professional development. Accordingly, the presenter will describe and discuss the implementation of an intervention proposal for Language Teacher Education students in a state university applying digital technology for the language learning. The presenter will also focus on the analysis of tutorials produced by the students enrolled in the second year of a Letras Portuguese-English course and explore how they gathered multimodal resources to produce meaningful texts using digital technologies. The research reported here is a case study (Stake, 2008) and the methodology applied is based on the principles and procedures from the social-semiotic perspective on multimodality (Kress, 2010; Prior, 2009; Kress; van Leeuwen, 2001). The implications of this study rely on the need of language teachers and researchers to understand how Brazilian students engaging with digital technologies and their multimodal resources in contemporary times may contribute to one’s teacher identity constitution.

Speakers
RG

Raquel Gamero

State University of the North of Paraná (UENP)


Thursday August 13, 2015 1:35pm - 2:00pm
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

1:35pm

Implementation of Small-scale In-house CAT with Corpus-driven Lexical Item Bank for ESP
Computerized adaptive testing (CAT), widely utilized in large-scale standardized tests because of benefits such as individuality and time independence (Brown, 1997) as well as accuracy, has further value in terms of validity even in small-scale in-house tests. This study describes the construction of an English for Specific Purposes (ESP) CAT system with an item bank of lexical items. The items are developed through the analysis of relevant corpora, specifically corpora of science magazines and academic engineering journals. After a few pretesting and equating using common item method, the number of items reached 180. A pilot test was administered to 63 Japanese university students majoring in engineering. One half of them answered 16 items which were selected adaptively so that the targeting probability of answering correct could be 0.5 (CAT1). The other half answered 25 items with the targeting probability of answering correct 0.8 (CAT2). Both CATs theoretically end with the same precision (S.E.=0.5 logit). M-UCAT (Kimura, Ohnishi & Nagaoka, 2011), which is a Rasch-based CAT module for Moodle, was used for the platform for this CAT administration. M-UCAT is developed based on a BASIC program of UCAT (Linacre, 1987). Ability estimation results for both groups were almost identical (CAT1: Mean=0.59, S.D.=.845; CAT2: Mean=0.62, S.D.=.841). At the end of all the tests but two, S.E. reached as low as 0.5 or less as expected. The actual percent correct for each CAT was lower than expected (CAT1: Mean=0.40, S.D.=.09; CAT2: Mean=0.65, S.D.=.06). This declination is mainly because the current item bank has a left-skewed distribution of item difficulty. It suggests that more items with middle and lower difficulty should be added to the item bank. The details of the pilot test, as well as the way to construct the item bank, are discussed to clarify its usefulness and shortcomings.

Speakers
avatar for Tetsuo Kimura

Tetsuo Kimura

Niigata Seiryo University
YK

Yukie Koyama

Nagoya Institute of Technology


Thursday August 13, 2015 1:35pm - 2:00pm
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

1:35pm

Interactivity' and Digital Content in 2015: Illustrations and Reflections
Learner interactivity with digital content is usually determined by language-based responses and the use of menus, icons, and pointers. However, technologies increasingly available in our laptops, smartphones and game consoles enable the simultaneous processing of a user’s gaze, facial expression, speech and hand gestures.

Spearheaded by Intel’s $100 million initiative DARPA, and Samsung, these emerging technologies are becoming inexpensive and more commonplace. These “sensing” technologies allow the detection and logging of explicit and implicit responses from learners, providing a wealth of data pertaining to a learner’s attentional, affective, and cognitive states.

Detecting a user’s gaze may yield empirical evidence of attentional processes (Smith, 2012; Winke, et al 2013) and provide information about what learners are looking at when they are reading a text or watching a video.

Emotion-recognition technologies can detect a learner’s emotions well enough to make inferences about his/her affect and attentional resources (Moods, 2014). For example, a “sensitive artificial listener” (SAL) can detect and process gaze and facial expression, thus enabling it to respond to the learner with more appropriate listening behavior (Schröder et al 2012) and “backchanneling” (e.g., head movement, brief vocalizations, glances and facial expressions).

Computing applications use the Intel RealSense SDK enables learners to manipulate objects on a screen using finger and hand movements. The detection of gesture in the assessment of comprehension can eliminate the need to rely exclusively on the selection of multiple-choice answers or typing for younger or less verbal learners.

Bi-directional video, such as Kinect Sesame Street TV, enables children to engage in two-way conversations with onscreen characters in response to the child’s physical and spoken responses to questions and suggestions (Rothschild, 2013).

Through a variety of short video illustrations, this talk will provide a glimpse of some intriguing applications and promote reflection on the nature of possible online “interactivity”.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Price

Karen Price

Boston University


Thursday August 13, 2015 1:35pm - 2:00pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

2:10pm

The Mediating Role of Cognitive and Social Presence on the Relationship between Perceived Interaction and Satisfaction in CSCL
Cognitive presence is defined as students’ perception of their understanding of learning content. Collecting relevant information and the effort they put into learning activities or assignments (Wang & Kang, 2006) are considered important elements for higher-order thinking and successful learning (Kanuka & Garrison, 2004). Recent studies of online learning suggest that there is a positive correlation between cognitive
presence and learning outcomes.

Originally interpreted as an inherent feature of differing media, social presence may also be explored by examining a variety of issues that may contribute to the social climate of the classroom (Gunawardena, 1995). Social presence is a factor of both the medium and the communicators’ perceptions of presence in a sequence of interactions (Gunawardena & Zittle, 1997) and is identified as a predicting variable for the success of CSCL (Wang & Kang). Therefore, more work needs to be done to understand how social and cultural discourses could affect individuals and their social practices. This study examines the learning process in two types of SCMC: text-based chat and video chat.

Speakers
avatar for YUMIKO ABE

YUMIKO ABE

Associate Professor, Hiroshima Institute of Technology
I am interested in communication between Japanese and Filipino EFL learners.


Thursday August 13, 2015 2:10pm - 2:35pm
Jefferson 256 17 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA

2:10pm

HelloTalk: Learn Languages, Meet the World
HelloTalk is the world's first language learning social network community. By reciprocally connecting language learners around the world, we have turned language learning into a new and exciting activity for anyone.  Now, language learning can be interactive both academically and culturally. With over 100 languages supported, and users in nearly every country in the world, HelloTalk turns language learning into a path to cultural understanding through direct engagement. 

Exhibitors
MS

Mark Samson

HelloTalk


Thursday August 13, 2015 2:10pm - 2:35pm
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:10pm

How Blended Language Learning Environments are Being Evaluated in Latin America: The Case Study of Chile
The present study reports on the findings of a piece of research conducted in Chile in which the aim was to come up with guidelines for a context-based evaluation of blended language learning environments. We consider the blending of technologies into language learning a complex phenomenon which involves a range of internal and external influences (Oxford & Jung, 2007). Researchers suggest that successful integration includes factors such as time commitment, competence development, course design, teaching experiences and reflection (Moser, 2007), whereas unsuccessful integration is due to barriers to adoption, particularly attitudinal factors such as fear and awe that can often stifle the uptake of new technologies amongst language educators (Bax, 2003).

In the Chilean context of adult learning, specifically ELT learners, we evidence that technologies are already integrated and evolving in classrooms that are blended; however, there is still a lack of clear guidelines on how to evaluate the use of technology and technological tools. In this presentation we share findings of a two-year research conducted in Chile which seeks to develop guidelines for effective and adequate evaluation of technology use in the language class. Firstly, we outline the theoretical foundations which support this empirically-based project. Secondly, we provide with a full description of the Chilean context examined to determine the presence of blended learning in pre-service EFL teaching. We then move to the research design and procedures along with the task and data collection, and analysis procedures (official document analysis, semi-structured interviews, to stakeholders such as teachers, students and administrators, and classroom observations). Thirdly, we comment on the findings along with integrated data, sample materials related to data collection and analysis for the Chilean context to finally discuss with the audience the future steps in this project and raise discussion, implications and potential avenues for further research.

Speakers
avatar for Marianna Oyanedel

Marianna Oyanedel

Professor & Researcher, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso


Thursday August 13, 2015 2:10pm - 2:35pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

2:10pm

A Cellphone Reading App for Language Learners
While the number of mobile apps for EFL is growing, most have been designed for explicit vocabulary learning; flash cards and word games get learners to encounter the target vocabulary repeatedly. These apps provide essential training, but they do not supplant the learners’ need to encounter the target vocabulary in context, namely through reading. Numerous studies have shown the effectiveness of an extensive approach to reading on improving comprehension and reading speed (Bell, 2001, Coady, 1997), and our project attempts to institute this within a mobile framework. The project is based on two email projects, one begun in 2005 and the other in 2009, that provide short daily or weekly reading materials accessible via both mobile devices and computers.

By December 2014, the two projects had sent more than 2,700 learning materials, of which most were short English essays and stories. As the materials were sent as emails, they may have been overlooked by the recipients. In order to help these students read more conveniently on their cell phones, we have selected some of these essays and put them into an iPhone/iPad application called Mobile English.

This presentation will demonstrate the free iPhone/iPad application and discuss its differences with other mobile language learning applications. We will examine the use of the mobile app by university students and seek answers to the following questions: Which functions do learners actually mostly use when they read English via cell phones? Which reading topics are the most popular? Do mobile apps encourage learners to become more autonomous learners? We will be using a combination of access data, surveys and learner interviews to answer these questions.

Speakers
JI

Jun Iwata

Shimane University
DJ

Douglas Jarrell

Nagoya Women's University


Thursday August 13, 2015 2:10pm - 2:35pm
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:10pm

Hello? Whatsup? Can You Teach English to Blind Students via Mobiles?
Due to the lack of expertise in the teaching of English as an additional language to blind students and the usage of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in this environment, we aim at investigating how technology is related to the teaching/learning of the English language, especially ICT used as Assistive Technologies, with the population of twenty visually impaired students. In order to begin the investigation, a Basic English Course for Blind and Low Vision Students was conceived at the end of 2013 and started in March 2014 and is currently in course. Within the Multiliteracies paradigm (Cope and Kalantzis, 2000, 2001,2004, 2005), this study was framed within Vygotsky’s (1978) socio-cultural theory that states that human learning and development is mediated by historical and cultural artefacts in the socialization process. The investigation design adopted for this study is classroom ethnography with data generation based on qualitative methods including classroom observations, collection of Whatsup and text messages, field notes, and guided interviews. The analysis has emerged from the triangulation of the data and relationships on the most common themes/topics have been tracked. Partial results show that, after six months of formal language instruction, most of them had bought a cell phone and were able to use the podcasts, the Whatsup and text messages in Portuguese, their native language, and in English. Some of them have chatted in a North American Facebook Group called The Visually Impaired and two others will start a course to become tourist guides for the blind in the city of Curitiba. Students with visual impairment have improved their communication skills through digital inclusion and English language skills to socialize with others from different parts of the world.

Speakers
VL

Vera Lúcia Lopes Cristovão

State University of Londrina
MS

Miriam Sester Retorta

Federal University of Technology-Parana


Thursday August 13, 2015 2:10pm - 2:35pm
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

2:10pm

Promoting Student Communication, Collaboration, and Motivation: Best Uses of Digital Tools in Language Teaching and Learning
The proliferation and availability of digital tools are having a profound impact on language teaching and learning. New digital and online tools are dramatically shaping the ways we teach language and the ways our students learn. These tools are opening up new possibilities to foster meaningful communication, interaction and collaboration in the target language, both in and outside the classroom. Language teachers are leveraging these digital tools to extend students’ engagement with the target language, and make their interaction with the material more meaningful and effective.

How can we best harness the potential of these new technologies to advance students’ linguistic proficiency? What pedagogical approaches should inform the communicative tasks we design in order to maximize our students’ interest and motivation? How do we integrate these new digital tools into our language curriculum?

This presentation will examine how language teachers can take advantage of many of these readily available digital tools, and how they are being used to enhance not only our students’ linguistic skills and their communicative competence, but also to improve their motivation and their critical thinking. Concrete examples of digital task-based activities used at different levels of language instruction will illustrate the pedagogical potential and applications of digital tools in designing student-centered communicative tasks that capitalize on student creativity and collaboration to further their competence in the target language.

Speakers
avatar for Margarita Ribas Groeger

Margarita Ribas Groeger

Senior Lecturer in Spanish, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Interests: Language pedagogy, technology in education, cross-cultural communication.
DJ

Dagmar Jaeger

Lecturer in German, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Thursday August 13, 2015 2:10pm - 2:35pm
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

2:10pm

Spanish Learning and Culture Outside the Virtual Environment
The present paper analyzes teaching strategies in an online foreign-language classroom environment. Of particular interest are the ways in which schools work to build a sense of community outside of the online learning environment and encourage students to become engaged in their respective communities.

While research on online learning has tended overwhelmingly to focus on university settings and/or adult learners (Harvey et al., 2014), online classes have become increasingly popular within K-12 instruction, both in combination with brick-and-mortar classrooms and in independent online schools (e.g., DeNisco, 2013; Queen and Lewis, 2011; Keeler et al., 2007). A 2013 report from the Evergreen Education Group, for example, states that nearly 620,000 students were enrolled in single online courses in 28 states during the 2011-2012 school year—an increase of 16 percent from the year before. In addition to the relatively small amount of attention that educational research has devoted to primary and secondary online schools, the participation and engagement activities that take place outside of the online classroom have likewise received little consideration. For second-language learners, these activities are invaluable insofar as they allow both students and community members to engage in dynamic forms of collective learning and assist in the development of positive learning environments (Cho and Summers, 2012; Cho and Jonassen, 2009).

The paper will present data on the activities in which beginning Spanish high school students engage in order to: 1) support Spanish learning and culture outside the virtual environment; 2) enhance learning; and 3) build a sense of community through interaction with members of students’ individual communities. The information presented will consist of activities in which students engaged during the course of an academic year of Spanish 1 at an accredited online high school based in California.

Speakers
LM

Laura Méndez Barletta

Stanford University


Thursday August 13, 2015 2:10pm - 2:35pm
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:35pm

2:35pm

Poster Sessions
Speakers
CA

Chikako Aoki

Hokkai Gakuen University
NA

Noriko Aotani

Faculty of Education, Tokai Gakuen University, Japan
avatar for Yu-Chuan Joni Chao

Yu-Chuan Joni Chao

Associate Professor, Providence University, Taiwan
EE

Elin Emilsson

National Pedagogical University, Mexico
KE

Kazumichi Enokida

Hiroshima University
avatar for Betty Rose Facer

Betty Rose Facer

Old Dominion University
SF

Simon Fraser

Institute for Foreign Language Research and Education, Hiroshima University, Japan
EF

Eri Fukuda

Chugokugakuen University
avatar for Thomas H. Goetz

Thomas H. Goetz

Director: English Language Section, Hokusei Gakuen University
Thomas Goetz is a professor of English and Director of the Cross Departmental Language Program. He has been a leader in moodle at Hokusei University, promoting blended learning at all levels. His research is in the application of computers for language learning. He has presented widely in Asia, the Americas, and Europe. He holds two Masters Degrees, one in Divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, New Jersry and the other from... Read More →
SH

Shuji Hasegawa

Uekusa Gakuen University
SH

Shinichi Hashimoto

The University of Electro-Communications
avatar for Stephen W Henneberry

Stephen W Henneberry

Lecturer, University of Shimane
educational technology, cross-cultural collaboration, student blogging, mobile technologies, extensive reading...
MI

Midori Iba

Konan University
EI

Emiko Izumi

Kyoto University of Education
KK

Kazuo Kanzaki

Professor, Osaka Electro-Communication University
I am a professor in the Department of Digital Games at Osaka Electro-Communication University. I specialize in phonetics and applied linguistics.
avatar for Tetsuo Kato

Tetsuo Kato

Assistant, Chubu University
avatar for Natalya Kuznetsova

Natalya Kuznetsova

West Virginia University
avatar for Jeff Magoto

Jeff Magoto

Director, Yamada Language Center, University of Oregon
CALL, language centers, and teacher training.
MM

Mitsuhiro Morita

Hiroshima University
HN

Haruhiko Nitta

Senshu University
avatar for Seiko Oguri

Seiko Oguri

Vice Director, Language Center, Chubu University
HO

Hironobu Okazaki

Akita Prefectural University
avatar for Sonia Rocca

Sonia Rocca

Foreign Language Teacher, Lycée Français de New York
Sonia Rocca obtained a PhD in Applied Linguistics from the University of Edinburgh, specializing in the acquisition of a second language in childhood. She is the author of "Child Second Language Acquisition" (Benjamins, Amsterdam, 2007). She has taught French and English at secondary level in Italy and Italian at primary, secondary and university levels in Britain. She has also taught graduate courses at NYU Steinhardt School of Education and has... Read More →
TS

Tatsuya Sakaue

Hiroshima University
TS

Takeshi Sengiku

Digital Language Lab, Stanford University
KS

Kayoko Shiomi

Ritsumeikan University
KA

Kamal Ahmed Soomro

West Virginia University
NS

Naoki Sugino

College of Information Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
IS

Ian Sullivan

Columbia University Language Resource Center
avatar for Hiroe M Tanaka

Hiroe M Tanaka

University of Nagasaki
MT

Mark Taylor

University of Hyogo
avatar for Akiko Tsuda

Akiko Tsuda

Associate Professor, Nakamura Gakuen University
avatar for Steve Welsh

Steve Welsh

Senior Program Manager, Distance Learning, Columbia University Language Resource Center
I'm the Program Manager for Distance Learning at the Columbia Language Resource Center, where I coordinate the Shared Course Initiative, a Mellon-funded collaboration between Columbia, Cornell, and Yale to share instruction of less commonly taught languages. I'm also a doctoral student in Communications, Media and Learning Technology Design, currently working on my dissertation.
EY

Eiichi Yubune

Toyo University


Thursday August 13, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
CGIS South Concourse 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

3:45pm

Effects of the Corrective Feedback of an AWE Tool on Developing FL Learners' Writing Skill and Their Learner Autonomy
The effective design and use of automated writing evaluation (AWE) tools in developing English as a foreign language (EFL) learners’ writing proficiency and learner autonomy have remained great challenges for AWE designers, developers, and language instructors. In China, the earliest practice of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) for educational purposes can be traced back to the Long Distance Education program at the turn of the century. Since 2004, a series of large-scale top-down reforms on the teaching of college English have encouraged instructors to employ language technologies in practice and the “computer- and the classroom-based multimedia teaching model” was highly recommended in College English Curriculum Requirements (China’s Department of Higher Education, 2007). Until recent years, some AWE tools have been developed and implemented for assessment purposes in EFL teaching in China. However, the rapid growth of AWE tool classroom implementation has often accompanied with fierce discussion and opposition. This study aims to investigate the effects of the corrective feedback function of Pigai system (a web-based AWE tool which has more than 4,000,000 users over 1,600 universities and schools in China) through a mixed-method approach. The presenters will demonstrate how the system has been integrated into the authors’ EFL courses from the following aspects: the system in actual use in both classroom and off-class contexts; some samples of formative track records of different level students’ writing scripts from three semesters; research data including those from students’ pre- and post tests scores and the followed-up surveys. Finally, some issues and problems with the system design and development as well as teaching design reflected from the system implementation will also be discussed. The presenters hope to provide AWE designers and developers with some innovative suggestions, and to shed light on the theory-based teaching design and effective use of AWE tools in EFL contexts.

Speakers
LX

Li, Xiaowei

Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications
LZ

Lu, Zhihong

Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications


Thursday August 13, 2015 3:45pm - 4:35pm
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

3:45pm

The IALLT Journal: Focus and Direction
This session provides participants with an opportunity to provide input on the focus and direction of the IALLT Journal. What distinguishes the IALLT Journal from other journals dealing with Computer Assisted Language Learning? What areas do the membership wish to see addressed in the Journal? What regular features do you expect from the Journal? We will examine the current guidelines for publication and discuss possible modifications. Please come with ideas and concerns.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Soneson

Dan Soneson

University of Minnesota


Thursday August 13, 2015 3:45pm - 4:35pm
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

3:45pm

Fostering a Language Center Based Research Community
Research experience can be extremely rewarding for undergraduate and graduate language students. It can broaden a student’s horizons and contribute to obtaining a future job. In this session, the presenter will discuss how a traditional Language Resource Center has been transformed into a modern multifunctional language center by integrating research components into its daily operation. A research community is formed to link undergraduate students, graduate students, language faculty, K-12 community and the Language Resource Center together with a common goal in mind, that is, to improve students’ global competency in an environment that is no longer confined to a physical classroom.

The Language Resource Center is home to six specialized language labs, two of which (the Faculty Development Lab and the Undergraduate Research Lab) are primarily focused on research. It is our priority to offer exceptional learning experiences to our students and teaching resources necessary for our faculty. Research projects are designed and implemented in a highly collaborative fashion which involves not only faculty, undergraduate, graduate students, but also the Center staff, and sometimes K-12 students. The connections are formed via lab time, audio/video production and by use of technology resources, such as online programs, and social networking. Our research topics range from study on dialectical variation in the Arab world to Japanese collocations and E-Learning strategies for vocabulary and grammar acquisition. The Language Resource Center plays a vital role as a hub in this endeavor. In the presentation, we will discuss how we manage research funding and research activities administratively at the Center, and how other Center facilities come into play. Sample activities and materials, students’ reflections and faculty testimonials will also be shared with the audience.

Speakers
MS

Mingyu Sun

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee


Thursday August 13, 2015 3:45pm - 4:35pm
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

3:45pm

Essential Elements of a Successful Language Consortium
With a focus on pedagogy and community building in interactive two-way videoconference-based distance learning courses, learn how the University of Wisconsin System has diversified language departments and grown language programs where they didn’t before exist through the creation of the UW Collaborative Language Program (CLP). This session will highlight the work that has been accomplished over the past 17 years of a successful language consortium. Participants will learn how our methods have evolved with the technology available to support teaching and learning. Participants will be able to identify logistical and pedagogical approaches that can be taken to ensure program stability, work around timing and scheduling differences, and guarantee that all learners are successful regardless of physical distance from the instructor. Examples will be given from Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian courses. Reference will be made to variations in approach that may be affected by class size and course content (upper level commonly taught vs LCTL courses) as well as what is on the horizon for the UW CLP.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Rosen

Lauren Rosen

Collaborative Language Program Director, University of Wisconsin
Lauren Rosen is currently the director of the University of Wisconsin System Collaborative Language Program. For over twenty years she has been integrating technology into her language courses and working closely with K-16 language educators in developing engaging collaborative approaches to technology integration into a variety of learning environments including both traditional and distance courses. She has also designed and taught online... Read More →


Thursday August 13, 2015 3:45pm - 4:35pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

3:45pm

Implementation and Practice of a Project-based College English Course on a BYOD Basis
The purpose of this study is to discuss and generalize the ideas to implement a project-based college English curriculum on Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) basis from an administrative point of view. It specifically focuses on such issues as hardware, software, network environment and security, and the skills necessary for both learners and instructors to carry out the course. Among language pedagogies, English education has been closely tied with the field of ICT for about half a century as forms of Computer Assisted Language Learning and Blended Learning. Today, their relation has come to a new phase with the advent of two factors: a BYOD concept and a Project-Based Learning (PBL) method. While this combination is expected to enhance learner’s active learning process, its application in English education is still limited in Japan to a few early adopters. Ritsumeikan University is one of them. Since 2008, three colleges of the university have implemented the PBL English program on BYOD basis to more than 1,000 students through a continuing process of trial and error, which the authors are part of. Students from freshman to junior are strongly encouraged to bring their own devices (laptops, smartphones, or tablet computers) to classroom in order to work on their projects throughout the course, from preparing projects to reporting on their outcomes. Instructors, often functioning as facilitators in class, also make use of their own devices in instruction, demonstration, and evaluation. Based on the experiences acquired from the practice, this study sheds light on pedagogical and practical issues, such as management policy for the devices students bring to classroom, software and cloud services helpful in filling a gap in ICT literacy among students and among instructors, appropriate and secure network settings, digital equipment and facility condition useful in smoothing in-class activities, and so forth.

Speakers
avatar for Syuhei Kimura

Syuhei Kimura

Associate Professor, Ritsumeikan University
Syuhei KIMURA is an educator at Ritsumeikan University and his research interest is how ICT can be utilized effectively in college English education.
avatar for Yukie Kondo

Yukie Kondo

Ritsumeikan University



Thursday August 13, 2015 3:45pm - 4:35pm
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

3:45pm

Safe Social Media: Edmodo and Google Classroom to Engage and Connect your Students

In our modern world, social media connects us to a world of instant information, as well as to each other. Teachers are the gatekeepers to the world of technology, we hold the key to ensuring our students are prepared to take part in the digital world. It is our job to ensure, however, that we teach them how to be safe; from obtaining authentic information to protecting themselves and their identities. One of the best ways to do this is to have them experience interacting with their peers and others in a safe space online. Two such useful platforms, Edmodo and Google Classroom are both used by our school for different and similar uses. Both are free, however, while Edmodo is open to everyone, Google Classroom is only available currently to teachers’ whose schools are approved for and use Google Apps for Education. Both have free mobile apps that can interact with them, and both can be monitored and moderated to maintain a safe environment. Edmodo has a true social media feel, looks a bit like Facebook, and can run your entire classroom - from assignments and quizzes to class discussions. Google Classroom is most useful to those whose classes have Google Drive embedded within them. Assignments, forms, surveys, quizzes, presentations, projects.. all can be completed and turned into the teacher through the Google Classroom. Our school uses Edmodo for international exchange interactions as well as to manage certain classes. Google Classroom is used within all classes that use Google Drive. Results show that students have increased understanding of computer use, and quickly learn effective research strategies as well as copyright restrictions, and more, making them better digital citizens.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Noxon

Erin Noxon

Ed Tech Specialist, Sagano High School
Erin Noxon is a Google Certified Teacher and currently teaches English and Science at Sagano High School, a Super Global and Super Science High School in Kyoto, Japan. Originally from Florida in the USA, she graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science as well as a Masters in Secondary Science Education, both at the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL, USA. She taught English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at a junior high in... Read More →


Thursday August 13, 2015 3:45pm - 4:35pm
William James 105 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

3:45pm

The Inherent Humanness of Online Language Learning
In many online language-learning environments, technology is efficiently used to deliver input and to provide individualized practice for the L2 learner. However, this systematic methodology rarely allows for relevant and meaningful expression of the self, nor communicative interaction with the other (i.e., the larger online L2 learning community). In this presentation, we will share our best technology-based practices for establishing and maintaining successful communication with the L2 learner(s), helping the L2 learner develop and express – in the target language - the self, and enabling the L2 learner to significantly engage with other L2 learners in the online setting. In particular, we show how to “add back” the inherent humanness of language learning in a computer-assisted language learning approach.

Speakers
MD

Matthew Dean

Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA 95521
avatar for Russell Gaskell

Russell Gaskell

Director, Language Learning Center, California State University - Humboldt


Thursday August 13, 2015 3:45pm - 4:35pm
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

3:45pm

To Flip or Not to Flip: Advantages and Disadvantages of a Flipped Foreign Language Classroom
Research has shown that the “blended/flipped” learning model can enhance student learning by creating a more interactive and dynamic classroom and by providing increased flexibility of time, location, and pace of study. In this presentation, two Japanese instructors report on their pilot courses for blended learning. At an American university, the instructors collaborated over an academic year, integrating a “flipped” mode of instruction into second- and third-year Japanese courses. This project sought to address two challenges both instructors had long faced: the relative lack of effectiveness of traditional, in-class lectures and the difficulties of engaging students in them. The instructors implemented online lectures, quizzes, and exercises in order to allot more classroom time to activities through which students could benefit from the instructor’s immediate feedback and guidance. To create the online lectures, the audio-video capturing software Camtasia was used along with Powerpoint slides. To ensure that students watched the lectures before class, online homework assignments and quizzes were uploaded to Canvas, the online learning management system, and assigned to be completed by the next class. Classtime was then reserved for activities such as situational speaking practice, in-depth discussions on grammar, and reading and writing exercises. During these pilot courses, the instructors discovered various advantages of the “flipped” approach as well as both anticipated and unexpected disadvantages. In this session, the presenters will share samples of the online content, in-class activities, and assessment instruments. Additionally, strategies for maximizing the effect of online materials and supporting students in becoming more self-regulated, independent learners will be delineated. The session, moreover, will recommend when an online method can be particularly effective and efficient and when traditional in-class instruction serves students better and is thus preferable. Plans for future revisions of the courses, particularly in terms of the use of technology, will conclude the presentation.

Speakers
KA

Kumiko Akikawa

University of Maryland
MI

Makiko Inoue

University of Maryland


Thursday August 13, 2015 3:45pm - 4:35pm
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

3:45pm

Using Media as a Catalyst for Communicative Interaction
Foreign language students in Spanish and German at Samford University are required to participate in a one-hour conversation lab each week.

The challenge for the instructors in these labs is to design and implement activities that will motivate the students to use the target language.

We use various media and technology as a catalyst for conversation, such as online games, virtual worlds, board games, computer-based problem-solving and task-based challenges, as well as thought-provoking images and videos. Although technology and media are an integral part of the activities, we design the activities to facilitate interaction between humans, rather than between a human and a computer.

We prepare students with 'micro-vocabularies' needed to participate in the activities using only the target language. For example, in one activity, students play an online variation of the game, Jeopardy. In order to do so in the target language, they learn specialized phrases associated with the game ("Which category?, "How many points?", etc.) as well as how to express jubilation or disappointment, depending on whether or not their team answers correctly. Students internalize the phrases used in the activities because they repeat them in a task-based context (repetition without repetitiveness).

The presenters will demonstrate several of their activities with video clips, and they will provide guidelines and resources for designing and implementing lab activities that promote communicative interaction. Qualitative data will be presented based on the student survey.

The presenters will also describe the unique wireless/cordless set-up of Samford University's Language Technology Forum, which can be quickly reconfigured to accommodate activities not possible in a traditional language laboratory.

Although examples will be based on activities in Spanish and German, this session will benefit instructors of all languages.

Speakers
CC

Carolyn Crocker

Samford University
avatar for Thom Thibeault

Thom Thibeault

Director, Language Technology Forum, Samford University
Areas of interest include hypermedia, learner autonomy, Language for Specific Purposes, Less Commonly Taught Languages. I am the author of FLAn (Foreign Language Annotator), a free hypermedia editor available at http://redhotwords.com.


Thursday August 13, 2015 3:45pm - 4:35pm
Jefferson 256 17 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA

3:45pm

There's an App for That: An Exchange
You probably already know about some of the best organizational apps to assist with file management and research, but there are also mobile apps that you can use with your students to foster collaboration, increase exposure to target language/culture, and encourage lifelong learning. Whether used in or beyond the classroom, mobile apps—particularly those created for use in the target culture—are an effective tool for learner engagement and the use of the target language in context.

This panel introduces participants to many of the presenters’ favorite apps, and shares strategies for successful implementation into a curriculum and daily life. Audience members are encouraged to share their favorite apps as well, and participate in discussions regarding appropriate learning objectives, goals, assessments, and other pedagogical applications for the apps mentioned. For a hands-on experience, participants should bring their own mobile devices, although it is not required.

Speakers
avatar for Kristy Britt

Kristy Britt

University of South Alabama
I am currently the IALLT Treasurer and outgoing LRC Director at my institution.
avatar for Stacey Powell

Stacey Powell

Auburn University
SS

Sharon Scinicariello

University of Richmond


Thursday August 13, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

6:00pm

FLEAT VI Banquet and IALLT 50th Anniversary Celebration
A perennial high point of IALLT/FLEAT conferences, this year’s banquet will be the best ever as we look back at 50 years of IALLT and language technology history and recognize Past Presidents, Board members and others who have contributed to the development of our field through these years. Join old friends and make new ones at this special event!

Thursday August 13, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Omni Parker House Hotel 60 School St, Boston, MA 02108
 
Friday, August 14
 

8:00am

9:00am

Sanako-Tandberg Educational: Can You Hear Me Now? The Advantages of a Self-Contained Language Lab Environment for Second Language Learning
In this 50-minute session, participants will discuss the ways in which a self-contained digital language lab is an invaluable resource for English and second language learners. In the lab environment, the notions of "real-time interaction" and "real-time correction" come to life as students are able to simulate the authentic conditions of the everyday conversations typical of life in the target culture. Under the supervision of their teacher, who fits the linguistic category of a "sympathetic listener", they are able to take risks and make the mistakes necessary to improving their fluency in the target language. The ability of the teacher to simultaneously record students and correct their mistakes provides students with the immediate feedback they need to improve their learning.

Exhibitors
TC

Terry Caccavale

Sanako-Tandberg Educational


Friday August 14, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

9:00am

Case Study: Blended Learning for Professional Development
This presentation reports on a 2014 professional development project targeting teacher-scholars in undergraduate liberal arts institutions. Funded by a grant for blended learning from the Associated Colleges of the South, this project had three principal goals: (1) to provide online and in-person professional development opportunities for current and future language educators at ACS institutions, (2) to promote cross-school collaboration among ACS faculty members, and (3) to assess the strengths and weaknesses of multi-site blended learning for faculty. The project consisted of four workshops delivered via multi-point videoconferencing with both online and face-to-face pre- and post-workshop activities. The presenters will outline the planning, implementation, and assessment of the workshops, including a discussion of the technologies used and their impact on the project’s success.

Topics for the workshops were chosen for their relevance to language educators at undergraduate liberal arts institutions. Participants are excellent language teachers who teach at all levels of instruction; their training and research interests are not language acquisition and pedagogy, however. Limited time and travel funding generally keep them from attending conferences that focus on language pedagogy, but they need to be aware of current trends and issues. Moreover, many of them, particularly those teaching less-commonly-taught languages, feel isolated on their own campuses. The interactivity of the workshops was intended to build professional communities across multiple institutions.

The presenters will use excerpts from recordings of the videoconferences and examples of the project’s online documents, discussions, and participant evaluations to discuss whether the project met its goals. There was a positive response to the topics chosen, but scheduling of the videoconferences, particularly across time zones, limited participation. Face-to-face discussion was lively, but faculty participation in the online discussions was limited. Modifications to address these and other issues will be made in any continuation of the project.

Speakers
PK

Paul Kuettner

Washington and Lee University
SS

Sharon Scinicariello

University of Richmond


Friday August 14, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

9:00am

CIRCLE: Communities, Identities and Research in Collaborative Language Education
The past decade has seen a number of disruptive forces begin to fundamentally reshape language education in the United States. These forces are not only driving change in traditional models of language education, but they are also raising important questions about the future shape of language learning environments. Three of the forces transforming the landscape of language education are globalization, technology and demographics.

CIRCLE (Community, Identities and Research through Collaborative Language Education) is a project that seeks to forcefully meet these challenges by bringing together heritage and intermediate/advanced language learners based in different cities together in a joint exploration of cultural identity. CIRCLE defines common areas of exploration and empowers language learners to validate their linguistic skills by facilitating authentic exchanges with local communities.

Hispanidades, as a part of CIRCLE, is an expanding network of heritage Spanish courses at a number of institutions in the US, engaged in cultural explorations of the Hispanic communities that surround them and in collaborative research by students in their academic areas of interest. In Hispanidades, students enrolled in heritage or intermediate/advanced language classes at two or more geographically distant institutions in the United States perform technologically mediated ethnographic research in a local community whose primary language is the one being learned. The research they engage in ranges from observing local communities to conducting fieldwork and interviews broadly within these communities, to carrying out historical analysis. The students at each collaborating institution then create, curate, and share original digital artifacts, based upon the ethnographic research they have conducted, and use these artifacts as the basis of a sustained reflective analysis of the value of these interactions and of the culture shared between and among them.

For those institutions engaged in cultural and linguistic research in local communities, CIRCLE can also serve as an effective means of collecting and aggregating authentic discourse, whether written or spoken. Avenues for dissemination of the digital artifacts developed in the course of CIRCLE exchanges include mapping, corpora, and anthologies around a particular community or cultural practice.

In this presentation, we will outline the philosophy behind CIRCLE, trace the genesis and development of the project over the course of the last four years, and offer a preview of the project’s expansion to different areas of the language curriculum at Arizona State University and at Columbia, including an overview of the planned corpora resulting from the Hispanidades project.

Speakers
SC

Stéphane Charitos

Columbia University
avatar for Andrew Ross

Andrew Ross

Head, Learning Support Services, Arizona State University


Friday August 14, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

9:00am

The US Government and Languages
In this panel presentation the panelists will discuss the relationship between the U.S. Federal Government and the language profession. The first presenter will give an overview of the relationship, speaking about government funding for language learning and introducing the topics he and the other presenters will speak on more fully. The second presenter will then speak on languages’ lobbying agent in Washington, the Joint National Committee on Languages, its work, its history, its documents, and how it is funded. After her presentation the first presenter will talk about government grants for languages from the U.S. Department of Education and the Department of Defense and his association with them as a recipient of grants and a reviewer of grant proposals. He will present in more detail the Department of Defense’s “Go” grants, the Department of Education’s Fulbright Hays grants, the Foreign Languages and International Studies grants, and the National Language Resource Center grants and talk about what grant reviewers are looking for in grants. The third panelist will then present about her successful grant proposal to become a new NLRC. She will talk about the process of writing a grant proposal at this level and all of the difficulties she encountered in the process as well as give tips for writing a grant proposal.

Speakers
avatar for Betty Rose Facer

Betty Rose Facer

Old Dominion University
ML

Mike Ledgerwood

Samford University


Friday August 14, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

9:00am

Complementing the Flipped Classroom Using Mobile Technologies
As a reversal to traditional learning, the flipped classroom is a new educational environment which is quickly gaining in popularity among educators around the world. In a flipped classroom, students learn the course lectures and content from online videos, materials, and other learning tools before coming to class, and spend a bulk of their classroom time asking questions and being engaged in interactive discussions.

The main purpose of this presentation is to present the results of a case study that was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of a flipped classroom compared to a traditional classroom learning environment. The study was carried out from April 2014 to December 2014 at Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo, Japan, and targeted 60 first-year undergraduate students. The experiment group was exposed to flipped lessons for 24 weeks using the English textbook ‘Lecture Ready I.’ The students were required to watch the course video lectures and online English learning materials using mobile technologies before coming to each class, and then created PPT slides for classroom presentations and discussions. The students shared their presentations and interacted with each other during the regular classes. A control group of students was taught using traditional methods with the same textbook ‘Lecture Ready I,’ but with no flipped lesson contents. The control students also watched the video lectures and answered the textbook questions, but only during regular classroom periods, including discussions among themselves during the 24-week period.

An assessment of pre-treatment and post-treatment TOEIC scores showed that the students exposed to the flipped lessons improved from 474 (SD 111) to 649 (SD 96), which was greater than that of the control group students, who improved from 484 (SD 123) to 617 (SD 115). By the end of the eight-month training period, the experimental group students had completed 80% of the course contents and substantially improved their overall reading, listening and oral communication skills through the online English lectures with flipped lessons.

Speakers
HO

Hiroyuki Obari

Aoyama Gakuin University


Friday August 14, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

9:00am

Integrating Cultural Learning into the Process of Developing EFL Learners' Output Abilities in a CALL-based Course
From the perspective of sociolinguistics, language learning is the jointly constructed process of transforming socially formed knowledge and skills into individual abilities. Schools and classrooms are important socio-cultural contexts consequential to individual learners’ development. As applied linguistics continues to incorporate innovative theoretical views and research methods from interdisciplinary approaches to language in use, research on the relationship between culture and language learning has gained much visibility in EFL classroom. However, approaches to cultural learning and the application of information and communication technology (ICT) seem not to have reached a similar level of innovation.

College English education in China has witnessed the changes in both teaching objectives and practical approaches accordingly. EFL learners’ cross-cultural awareness and comprehensive language abilities, especially their oral skills have been given top priority in higher education in China recently. Against this backdrop, the lead presenter has cooperated with some American educators and has worked out a series of English video-based textbooks for college students in China, Cultural Learning: the Smart Way to Study English (2003 through 2005) and Learning English Through Culture: Viewing, Listening, Speaking (2006). In this presentation, she will share her teaching and research experience with the audience and demonstrate how she has integrated the ideology of cultural learning, the goal of increasing EFL learners’ cross-cultural awareness, and developing their communicative ability into the blueprint of the computer-based course books, the curriculum design, and various output-driven task activities within and outside language classrooms. Through the innovative application of technologies with examples from the attached CD-ROMs of her books, some audio and video samples of the students’ formative track records of their performances in activities, and feedbacks from comprehensive surveys collected over the years, the presentation tries to offer some valid pedagogical suggestions and implications for other EFL course instructors and designers in CALL environments.

Speakers
WL

Wen, Lu

Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications
LL

Liu, Liyan

Peking University
LZ

Lu, Zhihong

Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications


Friday August 14, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

9:00am

Strengthening English Listening Skills: The Development of a Self-study Shadowing System for Tablets and Mobile Phones
The listening ability of English learners in Japan overall is low in comparison to reading ability. While the development of listening ability is inextricably linked to gains in speaking, significant improvements in listening will not materialize if learners only attend one weekly listening- or TOEIC-focused class at university. Therefore, the creation of a system where students train their ears while also practicing speaking anytime and anywhere without the use of a university computers can facilitate skill development. This presentation will detail the development and implementation of such a system in a general education program at a prestigious university in western Japan and consider the impacts on the listening ability of 900 first-year university students through a longitudinal study. Simply utilizing smart phones or tablets and their university ID logins to access this hybrid listening/shadowing system, students practiced listening to reading comprehension, TOEIC/TOEFL, and other authentic materials while “shadowing” a technique recognized as effective for language acquisition by academic societies and used by interpreters engaged in simultaneous interpretation training (Kadota, 2014). Students repeated, i.e. “shadowed,” after a model recording immediately after hearing it in one of four ways- mumbling, synchronized reading, prosody shadowing, and content shadowing. Student vocal recording are registered in the system and a pitch/intonation line graph generated on their devices. Utilizing these graphs and recordings, students could check their achievement levels while pinpointing areas to improve. Since instructors could view submitted recordings, evaluations could be made holistically based on overall study time and progress rather than only with exams. Increases in learner motivation also resulted from students being able to measure their progress on their own. Preliminary results indicate that the system has proven effective in enhancing student engagement and motivation in language learning. Gains are also hypothesized to have been made in listening ability.

Speakers
KI

Kayoko Ito

Kyoto University
JT

Jennifer Teeter

Kyoto University


Friday August 14, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

9:00am

Teaching Mega Sized Classes with False Beginners: Blending CMC and F2F Instruction
Many English teachers in Japanese universities today are facing difficulties. In addition to apathy and disciplinary issues, quite a few students are admitted to university without taking English proficiency exams. Students enter the university ill prepared in oral and reading skills despite studying English in both middle school and high school for at least six years. Class size sometimes exceeds 50 students.

While the use of computers has long been proposed as a means to cope with these issues, the situations have not greatly improved. For students with faulty background of learning English in lower schools with little or no autonomy, self-access learning with computers does not function well in many cases without teacher assistance. They need teacher instruction until they reach certain levels so that they know how to learn the language by themselves. This is where computers do not offer great help.

In this session, attempts to blend ICT and face-to-face instruction in more effective manners are reported. While making the most of the ICT features such as CMS, MoodleReader module and the Internet, the teacher gives active instruction to students in the most problematic areas, speaking and reading. For reading, autonomous reading is facilitated among students, providing advice and suggestions on how and what to read, while comprehension check and progress reports are taken care of by the moodle module. As for pronunciation and recitation, to maximize the effect of face-to-face instruction, the classes are divided into two, and while half the class works on individual tasks online, the other half receives intensive face-to-face oral training from the instructor.

Evaluations will be made using the scores reported in the daily class reports from the students, as well as comments and thoughts written in those reports.

Speakers
avatar for Yoshimasa Awaji

Yoshimasa Awaji

Associate Professor, Daito Bunka University


Friday August 14, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

9:00am

To Boldly Go ... : Facebook, Augmented Reality, and the Future of Language Learning
Star Trek’s universal translator, augmented and virtual realities, gaming … and language learning? Social media and augmented/virtual realities are redefining learning environments, creating new arenas that change how we interact with and perceive our world. In this presentation, we review the current language learning landscape, explore where it’s heading, and construct opportunities for educators to take advantage of these new opportunities and ideas.

We examine languages classes based in fluid social media virtual classrooms over a 4 ½ year period. We observe actual online and face-to-face classes taught using a Facebook platform (no other Learning/Course Management Systems), and multidisciplinary and social media projects created by students in a tiered environment. The online and blended/hybrid students are integrated, learning together, and collaborating on transmedia projects. The language classes explore culture in larger scale transdisciplinary projects. The highly personalized assignments are compiled into AR-portfolios. Students finish with applied language as well as transmedia and team-building skills. We also survey the impact that the social media platform has had on student success & retention data.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Lemon

Deborah Lemon

Ohlone College, @One, drlemon


Friday August 14, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

9:00am

IALLT Language Center Design
Are you designing a new language center? Working on the remodel of an existing one? Wondering if a language center is still relevant? This workshop will help breathe new life into your existing language center, help you design upgrades or new construction, and see what the current trends are. Topics include an overview of the design process, current trends in language center design, needs analysis, types of language learning spaces, labs, and facilities, and examples of successful centers. Come with questions about spaces for language learning and leave with answers!

Speakers
avatar for Felix Kronenberg

Felix Kronenberg

Associate Prof., Modern Languages & Director of the Language Learning Center, Rhodes College


Friday August 14, 2015 9:00am - 11:00am
Jefferson 256 17 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA

10:00am

Break
Friday August 14, 2015 10:00am - 10:25am
CGIS South Concourse 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

10:25am

Deconstructing Traditional Language Teaching Methods in Japan with the Use of E-learning Systems
In Japan, the higher education system is undergoing an important transformation at all levels, aimed at internationalization and the improvement of the quality of education. In this context, the English and Spanish Departments in Kyoto University have founded I-ARRC (International Academic Research and Resource Center for Language Education), opened in 2014 and focused on the promotion of independent language learning via e-learning systems. In line with this, the Department of Spanish has implemented a new project since April 2014 based on the use of Computer-Based Assessment and on-line tasks (Phase I). As language classes accommodate 40-45 students, monitoring student progress can proof very difficult, especially with 800 language students per semester and only two full-time staff members. Therefore, the objectives of this project are two fold: firstly, the use of these tools provides immediate numerical results that can be easily compared and analyzed which allows for standardization and better curriculum implementation; secondly, they serve as a learning complement to the classes students attend at University, promoting student reflection and improving student engagement. However, the implementation of this project has encountered some opposition among students and teachers. In Japan, the grammar-translation method has been traditionally used for the learning of foreign languages: a project of this kind requires a shift to a more communicative approach but, also, cultural change. In response to this challenge, we have designed a qualitative survey study (to be distributed in February and July 2015) to explore first-year students' perceptions regarding the impact of e-learning pedagogical tools in their language learning experience. The primary results of this study, the first one of this kind to be conducted by a Spanish Language Department in Japan, are presented in this paper. They will inform us on how to adequately expand the project to second year students in Phase II.

Speakers
avatar for Elena Prats

Elena Prats

Lecturer and department coordinator, Kyoto University


Friday August 14, 2015 10:25am - 10:50am
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

10:25am

How Picture-Word Discrepancy Interferes with Picture and Word Naming in English: An Experiment for Japanese Learners of English
The introduction of multimedia allows for a more effective use of images in vocabulary learning. When presenting vocabulary to L2 learners through a visual medium, one must be aware not only of how the word is presented, but also of the grouping with other vocabulary of similar meaning. This study investigates the mechanism of L2 lexical access and lexical network by looking at Japanese Learners’ process of L2 (English) orthographic representation (written word) and conceptual representation (imagery) during their L2 speech production. Forty-seven highly proficient Japanese learners of English (JLE) were tested on the Picture Naming task (PN) and the Word Naming task (WN) in controlled (picture/word only), matched (e.g. picture of a cat showed with a word “cat”), and unmatched conditions (e.g. picture of a cat showed with a word “dog”). The data gained from the experiments were analyzed to measure the speed of lexical access.

The results revealed that (1) conducting PN takes significantly longer than WN. (2) Among three conditions, the reaction time for the matched condition was the fastest by a statistically significant degree in both PN and WN. On the other hand, the reaction time for unmatched conditions was the slowest by a statistically significant degree in both PN and WN. Further analysis was conducted to investigate the picture-word interference paradigm. Unmatched pairs were divided by categorical relation and strength of relation. (3) Both categorically related pairs and strongly related pairs did not show stronger interference for JLE. It was concluded that (1) naming a picture forces learners to access its meaning, while naming a word (oral reading) could be done without accessing its meaning. (2) Having both verbal (written word) and non-verbal (picture) information accelerates the lexical access. (3) Even proficient JLE depend on their L1 lexical network when producing L2 words.

Speakers
avatar for Saori Dormantada

Saori Dormantada

graduate, Kwansei Gakuin University
When presenting vocabulary to L2 learners through a visual medium, one must be aware how the word is presented. My study investigates the mechanism of L2 lexical access by looking at Japanese Learners' process of L2 (English) orthographic representation (written word) and conceptual representation (imagery) during their L2 speech production.


Friday August 14, 2015 10:25am - 10:50am
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

10:25am

The Effects of Oral Sentence Building Task by Using ICT: An Error Analysis of Grammatical Elements
The purpose of this study is to measure the effectiveness of Oral Sentence Building (OSB) with the use of ICT in improving syntax and other grammatical components during speaking. OSB is a speaking exercise, intended for improving syntax, in which learners verbally rearrange three chunks of words heard at random to make a meaningful sentence. ICT was utilized to keep track of learning records, time regulation, and allow numerous subjects to complete the task on a regular basis. The effectiveness of OSB and ICT is measured by an error analysis of grammatical elements.

Thirty subjects participated in the experiment. Three hundred OSB questions (10 questions×30 times), including various grammatical elements, were uploaded to YouTube, and the URL sent to the subjects at a fixed time through e-mail. The subjects responded to the e-mail each time they finished answering the questions.

A t-test and correlation analysis were conducted on the test results. The results of the analysis were as follows;

1) The number of OSB practices and development in the use of plural forms

・Significantly different, intermediately correlated

This suggests that the repetitive OSB practice enables learners to pay more attention to plural forms when speaking.

2) The number of OSB practices and development in the use of articles, collocations, and influence of similar sounds

・Significantly different, weakly correlated

Results may have been dependent on the subjects’ understanding of the use of collocations.

3) The number of OSB practices & development in the use of third-person-singular-present forms

・Non-significantly different, weakly correlated

This shows that the OSB task did not significantly contribute to improvement in this area.

According to the universal order of grammar acquisition as summarized by Shirahata (2008), plural forms were acquired earlier than other grammatical elements including articles and third-person-singular-present, which supports the results of this study.

Speakers
FS

Fumiya Shinozaki

Tennoji Junior High School Attached to Osaka Kyoiku University
HY

Haruyo Yoshida

Osaka Kyoiku University


Friday August 14, 2015 10:25am - 10:50am
William James 105 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

10:25am

Is Cognitive Load in TEFL Always Undesirable?
Teachers have contrived teaching methods and materials utilizing multimedia in classrooms so that their students can understand class easily. What has happened in TEFL class in Japan, is not an exception at all. Even a textbook has been changed from monochrome to colorful, and one picture per a few pages to one per one page. Such a textbook with much pictorial information enables students to feel that they can read the text without much difficulty, but this is not always true. Colorful pictures conveying the story help the students imagine and conjecture the outline of the story. A problem is that students who have got used to pictures won’t read the text thoroughly by bottom-up information processing, and that they may have a trouble in reading in the end.

This study will suggest a possibility of giving cognitive load to students so as to foster learners with much cognitive capacity.

Speakers
MI

Mutsumi Iijima

Akashi National College of Technology


Friday August 14, 2015 10:25am - 10:50am
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

10:25am

Chinese Pronunciation and Romanization Tutorials and Diagnostic Tests
In conjunction with a colleague who is a professor of Chinese, the author created the original Chinese Pronunciation and Romanization diagnostic tests most than 20 years ago. It has been in continuous use at Brigham Young University and several other institutions since then. Thousands of students have used the software, adding up to thousands of classroom hours saved. Over the past year the original authors have completely redesigned the software, adding tutorial modules to help beginning Chinese students learn the fundamentals of Pinyin Romanization and tone discrimination, a critical skill for any learner of Mandarin Chinese. The redesign also includes tools for instructors that help them analyze problem areas for individual students and entire classes.

In this presentation the author will discuss considerations that went into recreating a project for use on modern computing devices, including mobile devices, and discuss models for saving data and tracking user progress. The presentation will include a live demonstration of the software and results of initial user testing during transition from the older to the new software.

Speakers
DA

Devin Asay

Brigham Young University


Friday August 14, 2015 10:25am - 10:50am
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

10:25am

Google Translate: Where Is It Taking Us?
Machine translation is becoming more and more widespread, from simultaneous translation on Skype, to in situ augmented reality apps. Within the context of EAP, Google translate can be used by students to understand complex texts as well as to create comprehensible, if flawed texts. It would not be unreasonable to speculate that this will lead to the redundancy of language professionals as students are able to circumvent the traditional language learning routes by use of free technology. However, this is not necessarily the only potential future. The aim of the presentation is to present to findings of preliminary research into what exactly the present state of Google Translate is able to produce from a grammatical standpoint. It will then discuss the key concept of the paper- that the incursion of the translation engine into the teaching space should not be seen as a threat to the language teaching profession. We will argue that Google Translate is able to deal with the surface level features of language, but is unable to approach issues such as academic literacies, epistemologically appropriacy and alignment to dominant discourse norms. Therefore, the profession will be able to utilize the technology to help students explore these, fundamental aspects of academic writing sooner and deeper. Finally, the paper will suggest further research into the pedagogical use of this technology.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Groves

Mike Groves

Universty of Bath


Friday August 14, 2015 10:25am - 10:50am
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

10:25am

Webquest Enrichment in the Italian FL Class
In the constant effort to accustom to the inexorably changing educational paradigm, many language educators have embraced and integrated web-based technology in their curriculum developing new, stimulating tasks for their digital native students. Yet, the multifaceted implications of such assimilation, especially in the domain of foreign language learning, need to be further explored as the variables involved are numerous. This small-case study, conducted with 34 Turkish students enrolled in an Italian as a foreign language (FL) class in a private, English-medium university, concentrates on the students’ perceptions of the incorporation of a WebQuest (WQ) in the already hybrid instruction at CEFR A1 level. The perceptions of the role of the inquiry-oriented approach on students’ language learning are analyzed in terms of 1. Language skills 2. Material and content 3. Personal and social relevance of the WQ 4. Positive implications 5. Negative implications. Data were collected through a PIPQ (Post Instruction Perception Questionnaire) and semi-structured interviews. The initial hypotheses are supported by the results as students display an overall general favorable perception of the WQ, indicating more benefits than downsides. The students’ perceptions shed light on interesting aspects of the learning process through the WB, which, ultimately, becomes an added value in the collaborative learning of a foreign language.

Friday August 14, 2015 10:25am - 10:50am
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

10:25am

FLIPOLOGY: The Study of Flipped Classrooms
Have you ever wondered just what the buzz of "flipping your language classroom" is all about? In short, it basically means students would watch lesson materials that are traditionally taught in the classroom at home and once they are back in the classroom, students will be able to practice what they have learned at home, thus making much better use of classroom time and increase communications and engagements. Although the concept sounds simple, but the process of producing and understan a high-quality teaching video is NOT. This workshop's goal is to provide the right tools and knowledge to prepare world language teachers on not only how to begin flipping their classrooms, but also develop a network of flipped classrooms that can connect beyond the workshop. During this fast paced three hours workshop session, participant will be learning first hand how to produce quality flipped classroom video to engage higher order thinking skills. Furthermore, participants will take the perspective of a student and participate in a flipped classroom learning simulation. Many technology components will be integrated in the process as a thinking, collaborative and presentation tool to facilitate a final completed video project. This session is open to all levels of technology users, however, a willingness to try new technology tools is a must and required in order to attend this session. What are you waiting for? Let's all FLIP together!

Speakers
avatar for Janna Chiang

Janna Chiang

World Language Department Chair, Laurel Springs School
Flipped Classroom Technology. Emerging Technology


Friday August 14, 2015 10:25am - 11:15am
CGIS South S050 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Seen and Heard ... or Not? The Dilemmas and Possibilities of Intersubjectivity in Shared Language Classrooms
While the effects of technological mediation on students' negotiation of meaning and achievement of intersubjectivity in synchronous CMC environments (audiochat, videoconferencing) have been documented in focused, two-party encounters, little research has addressed these phenomena at the whole-class level. Yet, in the case of the increasingly common room-to-room, video-mediated shared language classroom, where one teacher coordinates learning among two groups of distally located learners, questions of intersubjectivity and meaning-making as a group are of significant concern: how can teachers ensure reciprocity in participation and understanding in pair and group work across classroom sites, and in distributed whole-class discussions? How can students build confidence in being both heard and understood not just by their teacher (often the most visible, audible, or ‘ratified’ respondent in technology-dependent video exchanges), but by other students as well? And what affordances and impediments does the shared class dynamic create with regard to the formation of a sense of classroom-as-community?

The present study reports on two semesters of classroom observations, student and teacher interviews, and other qualitative data collected from a number of shared language classrooms in three private universities in the northeastern U.S., where instruction in less commonly taught languages is carried out through high-definition videoconferencing, interactive whiteboards, and other tools. A number of conversation and discourse analytic techniques are employed to reveal evidence of intersubjective formations (and the lack thereof) in classroom discourse itself (e.g., Hutchby & Wooffitt, 2008), as well as in the cultural framings and metaphors employed by students and teachers outside of the classroom, explaining embodied experiences in ‘real’ language classrooms in light of physical absence and the non-reciprocity of perception. In addition to offering provisional findings, the presentation concludes with the suggestion of strategies for the enhancement of intersubjectivity in shared language classrooms.

Speakers
avatar for David Malinowski

David Malinowski

Language Technology & Research Specialist, Yale Center for Language Study


Friday August 14, 2015 11:00am - 11:25am
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Using Critical Incident e-Portfolios as a Tool for Pre-Service Language Teacher Development and Reflective Practice
This paper will discuss how e-Portfolios are used as a tool for professional development and reflective practice for pre-service EFL teachers at a university in northern Japan. The presenter and his colleagues designed a pre-service teacher-learning program that combines practical experience with the course-work students undergo in four English teaching methodology classes over two years. In each teaching methodology class, students have a practice lesson at a local school. They are asked to write about a critical incident (CI) that occurred in this lesson and summarize it on their e-Portfolio. A CI is defined as an event or accumulation of events that changed teachers’ personal concepts about learning or teaching a foreign language. Farrell (2009) argues that teacher education programs need to provide case studies to pre-service teachers of the challenges, conflicts, and problems they may face. CIs are one way to do this: they can serve as a means for student teachers to follow their own development in our program as well as a means for other students to understand the issues they could face as teachers. E-Portfolios, like traditional portfolios, are a way of showing a collection of work to demonstrate one’s development. However, in order for the e-Portfolios to be assessable to a wider audience, they must present a holographic portrait of a teacher’s development. That is, in one screen shot it must show the nature of student teachers’ growth as well as factors that sparked it. This paper will discuss how the e-portfolios have been designed to give this holographic view and how the CI technique can be used on all students’ e-Portfolios to reveal the nature of their learning to improve future program implementation. It is hoped that the audience will leave this presentation with ideas for e-Portfolio design and ways of utilizing e-Portfolios.

Speakers
JH

James Hall

Iwate University


Friday August 14, 2015 11:00am - 11:25am
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Design Issues in Internationalizing Online Courses
This session will discuss the process of re-structuring a course in intercultural communication to incorporate participation by students and faculty from universities abroad. The course, "Communicating Across Cultures," is already offered in an online version, which is being revised in approach (less U.S.-centric), content delivery (an open access e-text in place of a commercial textbook), and structure (open platform replacing Blackboard). The course is being designed as a kind of private MOOC (or SOOC, Selectively Open Online Course) with invited institutions participating (currently from China, India, South Africa, and Russia). Integrating the perspectives and personal experiences of international students adds a major experiential, real-world component to the theoretical framework of cultural analysis introduced in the course. The revisions being made to the online course will be discussed in the context of moving from a closed, proprietary course delivery system involving a single university to a more open and internationally accessible course structure.

The course, as currently taught, features a set of online tutorials incorporating video excerpts, recorded lectures, self-reflective surveys, and interactive learning activities. The tutorials will form the basis for an openly shared, interactive e-text. Using international standards (HTML5, EPUB3) for the content delivery ensures that it will not be trapped in a proprietary format and that access will be possible with minimal technology requirements, namely a Web browser, e-reader, or mobile phone. The content of the tutorials is being revised to incorporate additional perspectives, with the addition of materials written or recommended by cooperating faculty from partner institutions.

Given the course content, it is evident that involving international students broadens the perspective US students receive on the topics discussed, providing real, personal interactions with cultures other than their own. Interactions among students will include Cultura-inspired cultural questionnaires, online forums and journals, and, as feasible, real-time video teleconferencing.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Godwin-Jones

Robert Godwin-Jones

Professor, School of World Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University
I am a Professor of Languages and International Studies at VCU. I do research principally in the areas of applied linguistics and language learning and technology. I write a regular column on emerging technologies for the journal "Language Learning & Technology".


Friday August 14, 2015 11:00am - 11:25am
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

The Use of Digital Tool 'Write to Learn' in Indonesian EAL Classroom: Working with Essays
A myriad research has demonstrated the use of digital tool as an approach to teaching of English as an additional language (EAL), but little research on this topic of interest has been undertaken in the Indonesian secondary school context. Particularly, the use of digital tool as practicing and examining students’ writing remains under-explored in this educational setting. With these in mind, the present chapter presents an empirical study that looks into to what extent the deployment of a digital tool mediates multimodal learning tasks in the EAL classroom.

The study specifically examines challenges and benefits of using the digital tool ‘Write to Learn’ to develop students’ writing and reading competences. The study also looks at the roles of teacher and students in the entire learning process. A total of 175 students in grade 12th volunteered to participate in this study. Individually, they were assigned to perform a series of tasks, including (1) connecting to ‘Write to Learn’ website; (2) reading articles and instruction in; and (3) writing essays. Empirical data were garnered from postings, students’ writing and students’ interviews.

Drawing on these data, the present chapter reports on four major findings, that is: (1) drafting and negotiating strategies for writing essay creation; (2) framing the use of language in composing; (3) discussing the result on essay creation and improvement; and (4) positioning roles of teacher and students in the entire learning trajectory.

Speakers
avatar for Nur Arifah Drajati

Nur Arifah Drajati

Labschool Jakarta Senior High School-Indonesia
I am a teacher in Labschool High School Jakarta and a lecturer in Sebelas Maret University Surakarta Indonesia. I love to learn new things. | You can reach me in Drajatinur@gmail.com.
YW

Yogi Widiawati

University of Indonesia


Friday August 14, 2015 11:00am - 11:25am
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Thinking Outside the 8.5 x 11 Box
Language teachers have been using Digital Storytelling (DS) in their classes for the last few years as a method of instruction, generally to improve their students’ oral proficiency skills (Kim 2014, Verdugo and Belmonte 2007). However, DS can also be used in content classes beyond language skills classes. As a replacement for the traditional research paper or final presentation, DS allows students to demonstrate their knowledge in a holistic way, by incorporating music, sound, and images in addition to text. As such, DS also serves a purpose as an excellent assessment tool. Final projects submitted as DS still must follow academic norms: a thesis or research question must be clearly expressed, an argument made and supported, and the language used must be of the proper academic register. However, the use of images and sound add complexity and a challenge to the task but also allow for much greater creativity and engagement with the question. In addition, because DS projects can be posted on social media such as FaceBook or YouTube, students have a much larger stake in doing their best work; the conversation is no longer between the student and instructor alone, but takes place within a much larger, global community. In this session, I will discuss how DS has been used in my upper division content classes as the final project and will show examples of such projects. I will discuss how DS is incorporated into the syllabus. I will also discuss the rubric that is used to evaluate the various stages of the project as well as evaluate the final project itself.

Speakers
HO

Helene Ossipov

Arizona State University


Friday August 14, 2015 11:00am - 11:25am
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:00am

Video Inclusive Portfolio as a New Form of Teacher Feedback in Teaching EFL Writing
The advancement of computer technology and its present contribution to language learning cannot be underestimated. Computer technology can also offer ways to improve the effectiveness of corrective feedback in writing instruction. In this respect, video-capture tools might give opportunities for language learners to improve their writing skill through recorded videos where their instructors comment on, or offer corrections to their mistakes and/or errors. These videos can be watched and replayed beyond the boundaries of time and space. The collection of feedback videos also serves learners as a portfolio to track their own writing performance. Therefore, this experimental study investigated video inclusive portfolios (VIPs) as an alternative to traditional feedback in English as a foreign language (EFL) writing instruction.

Over a five-week period, the control and experimental groups were provided with feedback based on correction codes and VIPs, respectively. The amount of accurate correction incorporated by EFL learners in two different groups was analyzed through statistical tests. The findings revealed that video feedback helped learners incorporate more correction into their subsequent drafts. Secondly, the study investigated whether video feedback helped learners incorporate more correction for different feedback categories (e.g., explicit feedback, simple mechanical, complex mechanical, and organizational feedback). The findings indicated that while the form of feedback (video or traditional feedback) did not show any statistically significant difference for explicit feedback, video feedback enabled learners to incorporate more correction in terms of simple mechanical, complex mechanical, and organizational feedback. Finally, learners’ perceptions were investigated through a questionnaire administered to the experimental group at the end of the study. The findings revealed that learners favored VIPs over traditional feedback because of its added advantages such as being information-rich and having the features of conferencing. The findings imply that video feedback is an effective method to provide EFL learners with teacher feedback.

Speakers
UK

Ufuk Keleş

Istanbul Technical University
SZ

Sertaç Özkul

Kadir Has University


Friday August 14, 2015 11:00am - 11:25am
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

11:35am

A New Approach to Vowel Visualization
Computer pronunciation feedback has traditionally relied on waveform modeling, where the student is shown both a waveform produced by a native speaker and the waveform recorded by the student. This session will demonstrate an automated vowel evaluation program that first positions in real-time the student's live vowel production on a simplified vowel chart. After the student has practiced the pure vowel, the student then records vowel production within words, again positioned on the vowel chart along with visual feedback for dipthongization, tongue position, lip position, and vowel duration. Prescriptive textual feedback is given for improvement. The test case for this program has been first-year German, but the program is not language specific.

Speakers
avatar for Harold H Hendricks

Harold H Hendricks

Supervisor, Humanities Learning Resources, Brigham Young University
Computer Assisted Instruction since 1973; interactive video since 1980's; learning center management since 1991; diagnostic language testing, digital video streaming, pronunciation applications.


Friday August 14, 2015 11:35am - 12:00pm
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:35am

Development and Validation of a New CALL System Evaluating Automaticity of L2 Reading Aloud Performance
Reading aloud is difficult for L2 learners; they must decode and interpret written information and almost simultaneously produce sounds with accurate pronunciation, rhythm and intonation suitable to the text. However, repeatedly reading aloud the same passage enables learners to enhance their automatized processing and produce more fluent performances.

Coefficient of Variance (CV), which indicates how learners' language processing is automatized, is often used in recent research focusing on reaction time (RT), automaticity, fluency, etc. CV, calculated by variance of RT divided by mean RT, decreases as learners' proficiency levels become higher, because their language processing changes from controlled to more automatized and variance decreases.

A new CALL system has been developed in the present study which can assess reading aloud both in terms of accuracy and fluency. The former is evaluated by using one of the latest speech information technologies named GOP (Goodness of Pronunciation). The latter is assessed by utterance rate: the number of syllables spoken per second. This is almost the first trial to develop a CALL system evaluating the degree of automaticity of reading aloud as well as accuracy, fluency, and content comprehension during repetition.

Japanese EFL learners, classified into high, middle and low groups, were requested to read aloud a passage five times that they had never read before and answer multiple-choice questions on the content of the passage. The time needed to read aloud each individual sentence was regarded as RT. CV was calculated by the variance of RT divided by the mean of RT.

The statistical analysis revealed that RTs and CVs across the three groups significantly decreased as repetition time increased and that RTs and CVs were observed to be smaller as the proficiency levels went up. These results are consistent with prior research. Thus the validity of the developed system was confirmed.

Speakers
YY

Yutaka Yamauchi

Tokyo International University


Friday August 14, 2015 11:35am - 12:00pm
William James 105 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

11:35am

Personal Factors That Affect Mobile-assisted Language Learning: Investigation of Japanese University Students Over Three Years
A series of investigations was conducted over three years to explore personal factors that might affect the mobile use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) devices for language learning. With the advance of ICT, the youths of today have many more opportunities to try out various types of mobile computer technology for language learning. This trend is even more prominent with hi-tech countries like Japan. However, while there are many college students who obtain benefits from hi-tech environments, a considerable number of students are reluctant to use mobile digital technology for language learning. The present study, therefore, aimed to investigate the personal factors that facilitate or hinder the use of mobile devices for language learning and the influence of those factors on learners’ language proficiency.

For this ongoing project, data from 434 students at four different universities in Tokyo have, thus far, been collected through an online questionnaire. The students were asked about their (a) mobile environments, (b) use of ICT devices, and (c) psychological attitude toward mobile devices, which are considered to be possible indicators to explain students’ use of mobile technology for language learning. In addition, as an index of learners’ language proficiency level, their scores of standardized English tests (TOEFL, TOEIC, etc.) were also collected. A series of stepwise multiple regression analyses tentatively revealed that students surrounded by friends with advanced computer knowledge showed a marked tendency to utilize mobile devices for language learning.

The presentation will briefly explore the current status of college students in Japan in terms of language learning and technology. Then, the design of the research project will be explained, and the results from statistical analyses will be presented. The findings of the study will indicate what kind of personal factors facilitate mobile-assisted language learning.

Speakers
avatar for Tadayoshi Kaya

Tadayoshi Kaya

Gakushuin Women's College


Friday August 14, 2015 11:35am - 12:00pm
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

11:35am

Publishing in the IALLT Journal
The IALLT Journal is a peer-edited academic journal published twice a year by the International Association for Language Learning Technology. The Journal publishes praxis-oriented research and review articles addressing the interface of technology with language teaching, learning and/or research. Often, these articles are written in the form of case study ethnographies, quasi- experimental classroom research, or emerging technology reviews. In this session we present a description of the IALLT Journal as it stands and describe the process for publication in the Journal.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Soneson

Dan Soneson

University of Minnesota


Friday August 14, 2015 11:35am - 12:00pm
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

11:35am

English Teacher In-service Development for the Digital Age: The Online Specialization in English Language Learning and Teaching
In recent years, Mexican Educational Policy has included a strong English Language Teaching Program which has as purpose to offer English language instruction to all children at an elementary educational level, starting with pre-school. As a result, the demand for English language teachers or for Elementary School teachers with English language teaching competencies, has increased exponentially, which has in turn, increased the need for quality teacher development programs which can meet the program’s challenges.

The Specialization in English Language Learning and Teaching (EEAILE) of the National Pedagogical University is an online in-service teacher development option designed to provide teachers nationwide in Mexico with knowledge, skills, attitudes and strategies to ensure effective results in students’ language skills. Our focus is on transmitting solid reflective and critical thinking skills while at the same time providing concepts related to language, methods, language acquisition, skills, intercultural communication and assessment, as well as opportunities for strengthening teachers’ own language skills.

In our Specialization, the online component does not only serve as a means of knowledge transmission, but also as an end in itself, providing course takers with tools for enhancing the online and b-learning aspects of their own classrooms, as well as strengthening teacher networking and international online communication.

Our presentation will delve into the following components: students’ digital skills, teacher skills, networking and international communication. After a presentation of the online educational framework we work with, we will offer a brief explanation of our program and goals followed by information on the results derived from data extracted from participants’ products such as wikis, assignments and projects that show the extent to which digital skills are integrated into teaching practices, and how these have an impact on teachers’ and students’ interaction with English language.

Speakers
EE

Elin Emilsson

National Pedagogical University, Mexico
DO

Daniela Otero

National Pedagogical University, Mexico


Friday August 14, 2015 11:35am - 12:00pm
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:35am

Aren't You Guys Done Yet?: The Joys and Sorrows of Content Creation
The prospect of creating content and assessments for use by actual language learners is at once a daunting and exhilarating one. Those of us who embark on it often underestimate the level of commitment and volume of effort involved when taking on this sort of work.

One might assume that many of the difficulties of text creation, image selection, audio recording, and so on might magically disappear if only more resources--people, time, and money--were available. Surely, those who create content with such resources at hand--such as those at a for-profit educational publishing company--must have an easier time of it.

But to those whom much is given, much is expected. And as a production process grows to accommodate flashier media and more complex features, the complexity of process oversight grows along with the multitude of handoffs from specialist to specialist.

Let’s explore the joys and sorrows of content and assessment creation, both as it is undertaken by individuals at universities and in the world of education publishing. We’ll tackle topics such as:

Pre-production: the invisible world

The kickoff: why is my horse always running through molasses?

Hiring: to outsource or to bring in-house, that is the question

Size of Staff: many hands does not always make light work

Tools: when WYS isn’t necessarily WYG

Content reuse and repurposing: can’t we just start over?

Media creation: is too much context ever enough?

Handoffs: why throwing it over the fence breaks things

The Goldilocks quandry: how do I know when it’s just right?

Creativity: when the well runs dry (or bubbles over)

Lessons learned: “Build one to throw away; you will, anyhow.”

Review: how, when, by whom, and how often?

Resolving issues: keeping track, keeping sane, and republishing

Maintenance: “Why are you still working on last year’s project?”

Speakers
LF

Lisa Frumkes

Rosetta Stone


Friday August 14, 2015 11:35am - 12:00pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

11:35am

Language Learning on an iPad Learning Lab: Opportunities and Challenges
In 2012, the Department of World Languages and Literatures of Southern Connecticut State University acquired two iPad Learning Labs. As compared to traditional computer labs, which have fixed desktop computers, these two state-of-the-art iPad learning labs are actually iPads on a cart, which can be rolled into a classroom and turn the room into a lab instantly. While the iPad learning labs have brought new and exciting learning and teaching experiences to students and teachers, they have also brought new challenges. Due to the different setup and compatibility of the iPad labs, teachers cannot teach in exactly the same way any more. They need to change their teaching practice to take advantage of the mobile features of the iPad labs. They need to explore new teaching approaches and styles that will work well with the new technology, and our students, a generation born and growing up with the new technology. This presentation will discuss and share our actual experiences in using the iPad labs in our language classes, including classes of Chinese, Japanese, Spanish and other languages. Actual examples will be used to illustrate how a new technology can be both exciting and frustrating, and how it can present both opportunities and challenges. Specific suggestions will be made on how mobile technology can be best used in a language class.

Speakers
JX

Jian X. Wu

Southern Connecticut State University


Friday August 14, 2015 11:35am - 12:00pm
CGIS South S050 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:35am

Re-purposing Speech-to-Text APIs for Evaluating Student Pronunciation
This presentation will demonstrate how language technology professionals can re-purpose existing speech recognition APIs in order to automate the evaluation of student pronunciation of the target language. Through low-cost and no-cost web applications, students can receive immediate and meaningful feedback on the accuracy and intelligibility of their output. The implementation of this software serves to reduce or eliminate the lengthy and tedious task of correcting and grading student audio recordings on an individual basis. We will explore and compare implementation options from Nuance, Google, Apple, AT&T, and iSpeech. The presentation will conclude with a demo that incorporates Google’s multilingual speech-to-text API that has been embedded into an online assessment tool.

Speakers
DN

Dan Nickolai

Saint Louis University


Friday August 14, 2015 11:35am - 12:00pm
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

11:35am

Teaching and learning the Smart way: The use of Smartphone technology to supplement foreign language instruction
Many university-level foreign language instructors prohibit the use of cellphones during class. In fact, many foreign language course syllabi include a clause expressly forbidding their use. I will call this practice into question by considering the potential benefits of using Smartphone technology to supplement foreign language instruction. The presentation will begin with a brief interactive discussion of current practices with respect to the use of technology in the foreign language classroom. Following this discussion, a rationale for the use of Smartphone technology in foreign language instruction will be developed. This will include strategies for selecting Smartphone technology to supplement instruction as well as when it is (in)appropriate to do so. The remainder of the presentation will consist of a practical demonstration of specific Smartphone applications that can be used both by instructors and by students inside and outside of the foreign language classroom. Problems specific to the use of Smartphone technology to supplement instruction will be addressed, along with ways in which such problems might be mitigated. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the purposeful use of technology throughout the presentation. Though not necessary, attendees are encouraged to bring their Smartphone if they have one.

Speakers
CK

Chase Krebs

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Friday August 14, 2015 11:35am - 12:00pm
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

12:00pm

1:25pm

Emotional Valence and L2 Lexical Processing: The Making of L2 Experimental Word List for Japanese Learners of English
There have been accumulating studies in L2 lexical processing. However, many of the studies focused on orthographical/phonological aspects, leaving the structure of semantic lexical representation undercultivated. The present study approached this domain in terms of affective/emotional aspect. Despite the long history of separating emotion from cognition, recent studies suggest that they are closely interconnected (e.g. Damasio, 1994 [from neurobiology]; Opitz & Degner, 2012 [from neuropsychology]; Pavlenko, 2008 [from bilingualism]). In the concerning field, there has been an attempt to make a measurable scale of L1 lexical emotionality by assuming multiple dimensions, ‘valence (positive-negative)’ being the most influential of them (ANEW database, Bradley & Lang, 1999). The aim of this study is to make Japanese L2 word lists with valence ratings for future researches in this field, which potentially will contribute to better understanding of L2 lexical processing and acquisition.

The candidate words were selected so that each of them is listed on both of the following English word lists: (a) ANEW Database, and (b) Lexical Familiarity Database of Japanese EFL Learners (Yokokawa, 2006; 2009). As a result, 390 words were selected.

32 Japanese learners of English participated in the experiment (TOEIC score: M = 789.4, SD = 147.5). They were asked to rate the emotional valence of each target word presented on PC screen in four-point rank system.

The statistical analysis revealed that there is (a) strong positive correlation (r = .92, p < .01) between L2 valence ratings and L1 valence ratings from ANEW database, (b) weak positive correlation (r = .33, p < .01) between L2 valence ratings and visual familiarity, (c) no correlation between L2 valence ratings and reaction time but U-shaped relationship was detected between them. The rationale for these results are presented followed by prospects toward the succeeding ERP study utilizing selected words. (298 words)

Speakers
avatar for Yu KANAZAWA

Yu KANAZAWA

Doctoral Student / English Instructor, Kwansei Gakuin University
enthusiastic to bridge the gap between what I have learned about language pedagogy as a student and what I have experienced as a teacher at high schooos and universities



Friday August 14, 2015 1:25pm - 1:50pm
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

1:25pm

How Do Smartphone Dictionary Apps Differ From Pocket E-dictionaries? A Qualitative Study
The present study is an ongoing project to examine how mobile learning technology contributes to EFL learning. The participants of the study were university students who usually use their pocket e-dictionaries for their daily English study. Also, they are heavy users of smartphones such as iPhones to get information. They were asked to introduce an English-Japanese dictionary application to their smartphones, and to take sufficient time to get used to the smartphone dictionary apps in advance. In the first session of the study, the difference in learners’ look-up behavior between the use of the pocket e-dictionary and the smartphone dictionary apps were compared. They were assigned a word definition and a reading comprehension tasks with their two types of dictionaries respectively. The time they needed for the tasks, the numbers of their lookups, and the quiz scores were compared. In the second session, which was held on a week after the first session, a recognition test was conducted to investigate how much the looked-up words were retained. The learners’ impressions and comments on each dictionary were examined as well.

In the presentation, the detailed interviewed data as well as the results of time and quiz scores will be shown. Pedagogical suggestions concerning dictionary interface will be made based on the findings.

Speakers
TK

Toshiko Koyama

Osaka Ohtani University


Friday August 14, 2015 1:25pm - 1:50pm
William James 105 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

1:25pm

Monitoring Extensive Reading Using Mobile Phones
Extensive reading programs aim to increase students' reading automaticity through processing large quantities of text, requiring that students read books that are interesting and of appropriate difficulty. Monitoring of extensive reading often includes quizzes, book reports, and word counts. However, these may result in intensive reading, reducing long-term motivation.

Supported by a research grant from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (Kakenhi grant #25370643), the presenters developed an extensive reading module for an open-source audience response system. Students report which books they have read, and rate the books' difficulty and interest level. Teachers can access summaries of the number of books each student has read and the popularity ratings of books. The system also provides research data formatted for Rasch analysis, providing measures of the reading level of individual students and difficulty of books.

Interim data from 509 students and 792 books returned reliability coefficients of .96 for student reading level and .92 for book difficulty, sufficient to inform text recommendations and future purchasing decisions. The major research questions of the project concern text features that contribute to book difficulty. Interim results from analysis of 95 books found sentence length to be the best predictor of book difficulty, accounting for 29% of variance. Surprisingly, Lexile measures, which combine both vocabulary frequency and sentence length, accounted for only 23% of variance, suggesting that vocabulary frequency derived from an L2 reader corpus may be preferable to the native speaker corpus used to generate Lexile measures. The low amount of variance explained suggests that student ratings of book difficulty may provide better information for purchasing decisions than readability estimates based on textual analysis. Definitive results expected in April 2015 will include text analysis of 350 popular books.

Speakers
JW

J. W. Lake

Fukuoka Jogakuin University
avatar for William R. Pellowe

William R. Pellowe

Kinki University Fukuoka


Friday August 14, 2015 1:25pm - 1:50pm
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

1:25pm

OER as the New Mission of the Language Laboratory
Since its inception in the wake of World War II, the language laboratory has struggled to contend with the vagaries of rapid technological change. With the rise of inexpensive mobile devices, ubiquitous wireless connectivity and a dizzying array of cloud-based applications, the language laboratory finds itself once again in danger of becoming a repository of underutilized technologies and multimedia resources. Yet this democratization of technology also provides the opportunity to escape the obligation of maintaining technological infrastructure. With this new cognitive (and financial) surplus, the language laboratory can now forge partnerships with language instructors focused on the production of Open Educational Resources (OER), broadly defined as materials distributed to the public at no cost.

This presentation will highlight work on Mezhdu nami (mezhdunami.org), a complete curriculum for first-year Russian organized around the experiences of four American students spending an academic year in the Russian Federation. The curriculum is the creation of faculty at three universities (Brown, Portland State and Columbia) working in close collaboration with the staff of the Academic Resource Center at the University of Kansas. It includes a multimedia-rich online textbook, a workbook in both paper and electronic formats, and a host of teacher materials, including lesson plans and sample tests.

As part of a larger group of OER projects, Mezhdu nami has helped to create an ecosystem that fosters both voluntarism and inter-institutional collaboration, allowing the project to be completed using existing budget lines. It provides a platform to train the first generation of born digital instructors and an opportunity for hands-on technology training for undergraduates. The production of these types of materials has also served as a catalyst to improve online teaching and to reconsider the nature of the 21st century classroom.

Friday August 14, 2015 1:25pm - 1:50pm
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

1:25pm

CEFR: The Use of Self-Assessment in Second Language Testing
While researchers investigating self assessment have considered various aspects of measurement theory, such as reliability and construct validity, there has been relatively little discussion of the value of self assessment as an alternative to more extensive approaches to achievement assessment, particularly in the area of second language testing (Ross, 1998). In this presentation, I present the efffective use of CEFR's can- do questionnaire in the university level classrooms, which have its potential to increase students' and teachers' motivation, autonomy and meta-cognitive awareness. The main purposes of this presentation was to discuss the objectives and limitations of CEFR(Common European Framework of Reference) and to investigate ten affective orientations such as Self Confidence, Anxiety, Willingness to Communicate, and Motivational Intensity on the participants responses to the Can-do Questionnaires. The questionnaires and essay data were analyzed using the Rasch Analysis and the relationship between them were analyzed using the Structural Equation Modeling. The results indicated that the use of Can-do questionnaires as the proficiency level measure was appropriate for this group of university students in Japan. It is necessary to provide with adequate practice and guidance in using the Can-do questionnaires in order to promote a deeper understanding of its purpose and uses.

Speakers
avatar for Wakako Kobayashi

Wakako Kobayashi

Assistant Professor, Nihon University
I am a doctoral candidate at Temple University, where I am researching CEFR and a development of Can-do statements, under the guidance of Dr David Beglar. | I hope I can finish my dissertation as soon as possible and also hope that I can make a wonderful memory with you all in Boston this summer.


Friday August 14, 2015 1:25pm - 1:50pm
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

1:25pm

Annotations and Feedback on the Web: Asking Native Speakers for Help
Writing for coursework on the web has become commonplace utilizing tools such as blogs, wikis, and Google Docs. Now we are seeing new specialized plugins and modules with a focus on feedback and annotations. We will look at a few of these including the Annotator javascript library, which allows the reader to highlight text and create an annotation for the selected text. We will also demonstrate tools for WordPress and Drupal that allow for comments and feedback by paragraph instead of the entire page, along with examples for when this may be preferable. Resources for how the utilities can be implemented into an institutional website or hosted free elsewhere will also be provided.

We will then present one case study of a second year Japanese class at Dickinson College that utilized one of these tools to receive feedback from their Japanese speaking language partners. The class does regular language exchanges using the Mixxer website, www.language-exchanges.org. Students are partnered with a native Japanese speaker for their lab hour every second week and complete an English/Japanese exchange via Skype. After the exchange, students submit a “Skype report”, an informal written summary of their exchange. In previous years, these summaries would be homework assignments and only read by the instructor or teaching assistant. This year, students will post these summaries to the Mixxer website site and ask their partner and other native speakers for their feedback. We will compare the feedback received on the site versus that of their teaching assistant as well as analyzing how writing for an audience changes our students’ writing. Interested instructors will also see how the same activity could be organized for their classes.

Speakers
TB

Todd Bryant

Dickinson College
AM

Akiko Meguro

Dickinson College


Friday August 14, 2015 1:25pm - 1:50pm
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

1:25pm

Do you need a bag?': Tools and Methods for Simulations of Everyday Tasks
In this presentation, I will describe a project called “Real Life in Russia” that aims to create a number of simulations of everyday tasks in order to help prepare students for study abroad as well as enrich the regular first- and second-year curriculum.

Many of the tasks that students have to perform immediately upon arrival in the target culture (like interacting with store clerks or buying transportation tickets) can be intimidating. They oftentimes involve procedures that everyone in the culture already knows. Difficulties in these interactions can set the tone for the whole study abroad experience, discouraging students from taking linguistic risks early in their time. Luckily, many of these procedures are quite formulaic, and with a little practice, can be more successfully managed more quickly. This project aims to introduce students to these formulaic real-life tasks and interactions, allowing them to practice them, in the hope that success early in their study abroad experience will help them feel prepared to perform more challenging tasks during their time abroad.

The project includes 6 modules: Transportation, Host Family Life and Eating, Shopping, Eating Out, Telephone, and a Capstone lesson, with other modules in the planning stages. I will share lessons learned and tips about tools and methods for creating these kinds of simulations, show examples of the current modules, outline plans for further modules, describe how the modules fit into the curriculum, and give initial student feedback to the lessons.

Speakers
SS

Shannon Spasova

Michigan State University


Friday August 14, 2015 1:25pm - 1:50pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

1:25pm

Interactive App for Language Learning at the University: A New Concept to Poe's Tales Using Digital Technology
Technology has been a powerful tool for teaching, mainly when dealing with foreign language contexts. The digital evolution made possible the change of reading support, whereas printed pages have ceded place for the screens of tablets, mobiles and computers. This scenario brings advantages to the ones who want to dive into Poe´s tales through a new concept of reading, where music, illustration and interactivity combine to give life to this nineteenth century great author´s stories. From this point of view, we aim at analyzing the first volume of the interactive app called iPoe, which includes four of his great short stories: The Oval Portrait, The Tell-Tale Heart, Annabel Lee and The Masque of the Red Death. In order to discuss the process of adaptation of these tales to digital formats and the advantages of this process in the language learning through the context of literary texts, we focus on the process of adaptation (NITRINI, 2010) of the tales as well as the context of production of both original and digital texts (BRONCKART, 2009) establishing a dialogue with the multimodality (ROJO, 2011) for the teaching of languages. To achieve our goals and stating that digital media is more than a “platform”, we discuss how technology affects the way stories are actually tell and re-tell challenging the traditional way if narrating them (HUTCHEON, 2013) considering the contribution of moving images and sounds. Moreover, we also focus on interactive storytelling, social media strategies, and the design of convergent, multiplatform and transmedia narratives (O´ FLYNN, 2013). We can state that the creative process of texts/books adaptation to digital formats has a huge impact upon the language learning in the university context, mainly the one in which teachers to be are being educated to face the new generation of learners.

Speakers
ES

Eliane Segati Rios-Registro

Northern Parana State University


Friday August 14, 2015 1:25pm - 1:50pm
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

1:25pm

Using Overseas Volunteer Program as Tools for Learning Language and Cultural Awareness
Finding opportunities for intercultural communication can often be quite a challenge. As the world continues to trend toward globalization, however, the importance of understanding and communicating with different cultures becomes more essential each day. Although the English language is considered the primary tool for achieving intercultural communication, learners in countries with a different native language, such as Japan, continually struggle to find opportunities to use it in this way.

In this paper, I'll focus on the effectiveness of an overseas volunteer program offered by Give Kids The World (GKTW,) in Florida, USA, in helping to overcome this problem. This non-profit resort for children with life-threatening illnesses provides an outstanding opportunity for learners of English to broaden their world-view and enhance their language skills by communicating inter-culturally with the children and parents who visit the resort, an amazing experience that is truly rewarding for everyone involved.

Since 2004, when I singlehandedly introduced this program to Japanese learners of English, I have compiled detailed research from over 40 Japanese participants. This paper shares these findings, and sheds light on how the simple act of volunteering in another country can be not only a life-changing experience, but also open ones eyes to the importance of a broader cultural understanding and awareness of key global issues.

The 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan was a catastrophic event whose effects are still being felt over 3 years later. One positive outcome of this event is the increased awareness it created for the Japanese, of the significant impact that volunteering can have. The generosity shown to the country of Japan from around the world during this time was immeasurable, and demonstrated the importance of working together towards a shared global awareness, one that is made possible through volunteer programs such as Give Kids The World.

Speakers
NS

Natsumi Suzuki

Otsuma Women's University


Friday August 14, 2015 1:25pm - 1:50pm
CGIS South S050 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Understanding Power and Identity Shaping in Synchronous Communication between Native and Nonnative English Speakers
This study investigates the power relation and identity shaping in the discourse of none native English speakers communicating with native English speakers in an international study consultancy Facebook page. This communication is interesting and important to be studied for several reasons. First, the popularity of social networking websites especially Facebook and their use by ESL (English as a Second Language) learners. Second, the analysis of this type of conversation mediated in technology in this context is essential to understand the power relations and the nature of the discursive practices used by ESL learners when they interact with English native speakers. Three questions guided this study: 1) what is the type of discourse involved between U.S international academic advisers and none native speakers (NNS) students in an online environment? 2) How does the online environment of this discourse affect the interaction of NNS and how power relations play a part in mediating this discourse and negotiating meaning? 3) What, if any, pedagogical implications does this kind of discourse have for ESL classrooms. The analysis followed Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) approach. This qualitative study follows Fairclough’s three dimension model in analyzing the data which is a set of transcripts of a synchronous Facebook communication. Findings show there is a positive identify shaping and power relation in this kind of communication resulting in potential pedagogical implication in ESL classrooms.

Speakers
avatar for Ahmed Fahad

Ahmed Fahad

Doctoral Candidate, University of Cincinnati
Ahmed Fahad is a third year doctoral student at the University of Cincinnati in the Second Language Studies department. His research interests are in second language acquisition and pedagogy, critical discourse analysis and computer mediated communication especially the online discourse between native and non-native English speakers.


Friday August 14, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Securing a leadership position within IALLT’s board and council: What can you do for IALLT? What is in it for you?
IALLT, like most professional organizations, has an executive board constituted by five elected representatives and a council comprised by several unique positions with specific responsibilities. Any IALLT member can be elected to serve on the board and could volunteer to be a council member. For IALLT to continue to grow and thrive as an organization it needs a dynamic, knowledgeable, and effective board and council that can provide strong leadership. There are several IALLT board and council positions that are currently or soon to become vacant. To strengthen and further the work of IALLT it is imperative that these positions are filled by motivated and competent members. Also, in the recent IALLT survey several IALLT members indicated that although they wished to serve in a leadership position within IALLT they were unsure as to how they could do so. This session is intended to address these organizational and membership needs.
In this session presenters will talk about:
• What leadership role they currently are in IALLT (and other roles they have served in)
• Why they volunteered to serve in this role, what major tasks they have accomplished for IALLT in their position, and what they have gained by performing this role
• The IALLT board and council positions that are currently vacant and the position requirements

Speakers
SG

Sangeetha Gopalakrishnan

Wayne State University
avatar for Harold H Hendricks

Harold H Hendricks

Supervisor, Humanities Learning Resources, Brigham Young University
Computer Assisted Instruction since 1973; interactive video since 1980's; learning center management since 1991; diagnostic language testing, digital video streaming, pronunciation applications.
avatar for Betsy Lavolette

Betsy Lavolette

Director, Language Resource Center, Gettysburg College
avatar for Stacey Powell

Stacey Powell

Auburn University
avatar for Dan Soneson

Dan Soneson

University of Minnesota


Friday August 14, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Fostering Faculty Communities of Practice in Technology-Enabled Active Learning Ecosystems
This session focuses on a dual-track agile professional development model that established a community of practice for faculty members teaching with advanced technologies and active learning strategies in new learning ecosystems. This program was developed to prepare the faculty for teaching in digital-age flexible learning spaces that were launched on campus. In 2014-15, a total of 28 faculty members participated in two cohorts of a special professional development project.  In cohort 1, faculty participated in summer workshops and transformed ("flipped") one lesson or module in their current traditional course.  In cohort 2, faculty participants completed summer training and transformed ("flipped") an entire course.  The participants that were selected to participate in these newly special professional development projects attended full-day workshops in which they explored a variety of collaborative technologies along with technology-enabled active learning methods. The participants became a community of practice and received support from professionals and peers for their course-redesign which was focused on the development of hybrid course modules or entire hybrid courses. In accordance to the FLIP principle (www.flippedlearning.org), these courses were taught in flexible learning spaces that are designed to integrate mobile and collaborative technologies while promoting a learning culture that intentionally shifts from a teacher-centered to a student-centered approach. In addition, students have access to online content in preparation for and following their active learning sessions that are designed to promote deep learning. The role of the instructor changed to that of a facilitator who designed the learning experience, provide formative feedback and just-in-time instruction. This student-centered active learning environment proved to provide both significant enhancements for learning and student engagement as well as specific challenges in implementation. This session will explore both the advantages and challenges of the flipped learning approach and will discuss the lessons to be learned from the faculty community approach to student-oriented, active learning environment. The presenters will detail specific support, training topics, methodologies, experiences, and evaluation information.  This session will be collaborative and interactive where presenters and attendees discuss ideas, challenges, and best practices. The presenters will share preliminary data from this project and provide access to resources. Although developed for higher education, this faculty development model is also applicable to K-12.

Speakers
UL

Ute Lahaie

Walsh University


Friday August 14, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

A MOOC auf Deutsch: Communicating Across Cultures
In this presentation, panelists will discuss a theme-based German MOOC for a global audience with multiple learning styles and diverse cultural backgrounds. This experimental course on Coursera is for beginners wanting to learn and use language to understand and exchange attitudes towards culture and society as represented by a multicultural and multiethnic audience. Panelists will discuss the methodology and technology used to promote learner interaction with the instructors, the content and other learners. Although this course is for the beginner, we will discuss how native speakers might participate in the MOOC’s language communities and exchanges to provide models of authentic and accurate language usage. Using a MOOC as a vehicle to bridge cultures and build global communities is the primary goal of the course whereby learners and expert speakers of German might continue beyond the course to share with each other their languages and cultures on a reciprocal basis.

For the purpose of learning and applying language as a medium to convey meaning - within the context of themes related to the modern family, nutrition, and “Green Germany” - we have adapted a technology- and multimedia-enhanced methodology based on Bühler’s threefold functions of language to express, make requests and represent. Online videos and content will engage learners with comprehensible input and models for language usage in thematic contexts. Learners will then be prompted and directed to create and represent through the target language their cultural attitudes and backgrounds. As learners traverse this threefold technology-enhanced process and begin to interact with each other in discussions, VoiceThreads, and other social media, they will begin to employ all three functions of communication. These peer-to-peer interactions also serve the purpose of overcoming challenges of purely content- or task-based MOOCs in that they focus on building and sustaining communities (Beaven et al., 2014).

Speakers
ED

Ed Dixon

University of Pennsylvania
CF

Carolin Fuchs

Teachers College, Columbia University


Friday August 14, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Bridging the Gap Between Closed and Open Exercises, or How to Make CALL More Intelligent
Since its very beginning, CALL has often been identified with closed exercises such as multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank or drag-and-drop, allowing for one perfectly predictable and automatically gradable answer. Beatty (2003:11) still argues that “many programs being produced today feature little more than visually stimulating variations on the same gap-filling exercises used 40 years ago”. Meanwhile, the rise of CMC, serious gaming or social media has radically altered the type of communicative activities and tasks digital learning environments can offer. In most cases, we are dealing now with completely open activities allowing for unpredictable and spontaneous production.

However important may be the recent possibilities offered by computer augmented interaction with real world environments or by communication in immersive virtual worlds, one cannot deny that item-based exercise and test platforms allowing amongst others for focus-on-form activities haven’t lost anything of their relevance.

One of the main actual challenges is to make these item-based language learning environments more effective and attractive. This explains why there is for instance a growing interest in adaptivity in order to adjust one or more characteristics of the environment in function of the learner’s needs and preferences and/or the context.

Another challenging approach is to examine to what extent we can further diversify the types of exercises we offer. This presentation offers first of all a consistent typology of all possible exercise types based on such parameters as the degrees of freedom of input, the number of correct answers or the type of correction offered.

We then focus on three exercise types we designed, implemented and evaluated in order to move beyond the closed exercises. We first present “select text” as an example of a half-closed exercise type characterized by a limited degree of freedom of input and a limited number of correct answers but where possible answers are not given in beforehand. Next, we deal with half-open exercises such as “translate” or “reformulate” allowing for many answers, but that can still be automatically graded. We examine to what extent the analysis of learner output using NLP-approaches makes it possible to go beyond (more limited) approximate string matching techniques. We finally tackle the supported open exercise type which combines complete freedom of input with half-automated correction.

Speakers
avatar for Piet Desmet

Piet Desmet

Full Professor, University of Leuven (Belgium)
I'm' a Full Professor of French & Applied Linguistics at the University of Leuven (Belgium) and its campus in Kortrijk. I'm coordinating the iMinds research team ITEC, focusing on educational technology & (language) learning. Our main interests are half-open activities, adaptive language learning, intelligent CALL, serious gaming & multimedia CALL. Always interested in new challenging research projects and international exchanges.
BW

Bert Wylin

University of Leuven


Friday August 14, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Developing Oral Proficiency Using Digital Audio and Video Tools
In communication-oriented instruction, like the one implemented in our programs at Boston University, students at all levels need to have ample opportunities to develop and reinforce speaking skills. During the past two years, several language faculty members have participated in workshops aimed at measuring performance as well as developing proficiency in all four skills, including speaking. Co-sponsored by the Director of Language Instruction and the Geddes Language Center, these workshops cover a broad range of topics. They include Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) training through ACTFL, CARLA Summer Institute workshops at the University of Minnesota, and ACTFL Webinars from the Series entitled “Developing Learners’ Performance Aiming at Proficiency.”

Accompanying this effort has been the sustained use of five specific technology applications involving digital audio and video. These are: Flipgrid, Voicethread, RecordPad, TalkAbroad, and DiLL (The Digital Language Lab). Our approach in selecting and supporting these technologies is to rely on four key principles in agile systems design, namely usability, accessibility, portability and scalability. Such an approach helps ensure a smooth and simple integration as well as the continued use of these technologies by faculty and students with long-range implications for enhanced learning.

In our presentation, we will describe activities created by our faculty in which students practice speaking at different levels of language learning, and that utilize these technologies either in our lab or in the cloud. We will also provide details on the benefits of applying agile systems design principles to the selection of eLearning tools for the development of oral proficiency, including handhelds and other mobile devices. Additionally, we will focus attention on integrating and accessing the recordings of students’ oral production in the university’s learning management system.

Speakers
avatar for Liliane Duséwoir

Liliane Duséwoir

Senior Lecturer in French, Boston University
I work mainly with students minoring or majoring in French. Some of my specialties include graphic novels, interpretation techniques and writing analytics. I am interested in automatic speech recognition, subtitling techniques, software that develops and refines writing skills, and digital language labs, to promote comprehensible, spontaneous and sustained speech.
avatar for Mark Lewis

Mark Lewis

Director - Geddes Language Center, Boston University
SP

Shawn Provencal

Boston University


Friday August 14, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
CGIS South S050 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Flip Your Language Class
When it comes to learning foreign languages, combining technology and human instruction is more powerful than either computer learning or human instruction alone. The flipped language classroom is an exciting new methodology in education where students use technology and authentic language materials to “front load” their language abilities by learning vocabulary words and phrases independently before each class. Teachers then build on what their students have already learned, practicing and applying that knowledge in class through communicative activities and task-based strategies. Whether the classroom is physical or virtual, the result is a more rewarding experience, in which students spend more time actively and successfully engaging with the instructor and each other. This involvement, in turn, leads to dramatic improvements in listening and speaking proficiency, as well as more motivated students. This presentation will address the pedagogical background of the flipped language classroom and how it differs from other subjects. It will also demonstrate a step-by-step process to implement this educational model for language learning in a way that lets both technology and teachers do what they do best.

Speakers
KO

Karen Olson

Transparent Language


Friday August 14, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
William James 105 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Going Global! Teachers Teaching Students ... Students Teaching Teachers!
This session outlines the value of student project-based learning with the course taught entirely in the target language (Spanish) at a wireless laptop / iPad school. Grade 12 Pine Crest students will give "live" presentations without the use of notes and incorporating realia into the theme of their presentations. A follow-up video trailer highlights and summarizes each presentation. The presentations incorporate reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills for 21st Century Learners using the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines and the five C's (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, Communities). The themes are student selected, researched, and initiated, thus providing "meaningful" learning and purpose for the student. Participants of the session will model classmates in asking open questions to the presenters relating to the themes presented. A follow-up question / answer session will conclude the session.

The following Pinecrest students are unable to attend FLEAT 6 but have contributed to this session:

Molly Rose Malaney
Kyle Ockerman


Speakers
avatar for Frank Kruger-Robbins

Frank Kruger-Robbins

Chair - World Languages Department, Pine Crest School
Frank Kruger-Robbins | Chair - World Languages Department | Pine Crest School | 1501 Northeast 62 Street | Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334 | 954.351.4630 | frank.kruger-robbins@pinecrest.edu | www.pinecrest.edu | | https://www.pinecrest.edu/ | | http://www.pinecrest.edu/podium/default.aspx?t=153856&rc=0 | | Office Telephone: (954) 351-4630 | | Email: frank.kruger-robbins@pinecrest.edu | | IALLT K-12 Coordinator... Read More →


Friday August 14, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
CGIS South S020 (Belfer Case Study Room) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Maximizing Study Abroad Through Flickr, Weebly, and Google Sites
This campus’s Japanese program offers a course intended to enhance study abroad experiences, and minimize culture shock at departure and reentry, by providing structured tools and guidance before students depart. Modeled on the UT Austin LESCANT photo project, this course takes advantage of a student's typical inclination to take photos of their experiences and requires students to use selected images to document their experiences in a digital portfolio during their time abroad. The course uses ‘free’ resources, such as Flickr.com, GoogleSites and Weebly.com to post that documentation. After return, faculty members encourage students to integrate that documentation into their senior year electronic graduation portfolios. This presentation will highlight the tools, process and structures implemented to encourage student participation, and coordinate efforts for students across multiple study abroad destination campuses.

Speakers
avatar for Gus Leonard

Gus Leonard

Language Lab Coordinator, California State University - Monterey Bay
Gus Leonard is the Language Lab Coordinator for the School of World Languages and Cultures at California State University, Monterey Bay. He supports the various technology, and language and culture learning efforts in formal and informal learning environments in WLC. Gus also teaches a course for heritage language learners, and in the American Language and Culture Program (ESL). He is the IALLT Board Secretary/Parliamentarian and owns an art... Read More →
YS

Yoshiko Saito-Abbott

California State University - Monterey Bay


Friday August 14, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Pedagogical Practices in Computer-assisted Language Learning Within and Outside the Classroom on Web-based English Language Skills
The effective design and innovative application of computer-based tools should provide EFL learners with better learning environments and help build conducive language learning communities within and outside the classroom.. This presentation will demonstrate the use of an English Language Skills Training System which has been designed and developed by the presenters since 2008.

In the workshop we will take you to experience the use of the system in practice through the following steps:

1. Log in to the Resource Management System(RMS) as a teacher, and you will see an interactive multimedia question and test items editor, then follow the instruction and you will see there are more than 18 different items as templates, and next, design your innovative item, input and editing learning resources in it, finally, release it to the resource library when you finish the work.

2. Log in to the Course Management System (CMS) as a teacher, combine the items in the resource library with a number of task activities, arrange schedules for students within and outside the classroom either for assessment purpose or skills training.

3. Log in to the Language Learning Smart Client (LLSC) as a student, complete the
corresponding task arranged by the teacher, then start a centralized test on schedule.

Last, you will experience conducting assigned interactive task activities through the system.

4. Log in to CMS again as a teacher to see and download the record of students’ performance.

Teachers can arrange activities to guide students in their learning, collect data to construct or prescribe exercises, tests, and conduct surveys. It also enables instructors to comment on students’ homework and tests separate from the automatically provided scores, and learners’ feedback or comments can be collected. In a word, teachers can collect their students’ formative data in the process through the system.

Speakers
WF

Wen, Fuan

Beijing University of Posts & Telecommunications
LZ

Lu, Zhihong

Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications


Friday August 14, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

2:00pm

Taking on the Multimedia Appsmashing iPad Challenge!
Appsmashing is "the process of using multiple apps in conjunction with one another to complete a final task or project" according to Greg Kulowiec who coined the term. This session will show how appsmashing can enhance language learning through the productive skills of speaking and writing as well as promoting the 4 C's of Creativity, Collaboration, Critical thinking and Communication.

Appsmashing challenges language learners to access higher order thinking skills and gives them ownership of their work. They can produce engaging layered digital storytelling projects which channel their creativity in multifaceted ways and promote personal expression. Language learners are able to work creatively and collaboratively to produce writing and speaking in one multimedia outcome giving them extensive and rigorous practice of the productive skills which they can easily publish to a worldwide audience on a blog or video sharing site.

Appsmashing allows them to draft, redraft, refine and edit what they have done as a vehicle for promoting creative writing or improving pronunciation. Students are able to work independently and at their own pace or collaborate with their peers.

In the session, we will look at some practical examples or recipes for combining different apps together to produce collaborative video projects, interactive posters and multimedia comic books which lend themselves very well to enhancing language learning. We will also explore some language specific lesson planning guidance and outcomes produced by young learners in the UK.

Are you up for the challenge? If you like the idea of turning an original idea on its head and coming up with something which is far more engaging, relevant and important to young people, then this could be the perfect session for you!

Speakers

Friday August 14, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

Strategying: Interactions Between Extroversion/ Introversion and Learner Strategy Use
This presentation reports on a strategy training experiment with Japanese learners of English based on a theoretical framework of Strategying, in which the relationship between learner styles—extroversion/introversion—and learner strategy use was carefully examined.

The aim of this study was threefold: (1) how Strategying of vocabulary contributes to improvements in vocabulary knowledge or in English proficiency in general; (2) what interaction between learner styles and strategy training can be observed; and (3) how participants find their best-fit strategies (BFSs).

Participants, 12 English-major college female students in Japan, were divided into three groups and advised to memorize 7 words per day for 9 weeks, following the four-stage Strategying model: (1) (metacognitive stage) participants were initially asked to discuss what strategies could be used; (2) (individual-based stage) they were told that they could develop their own preferred individual strategies; (3) (group-based stage) they met in groups once a week to share the strategies they were using in the individual stage; and (4) (BFS stage) reflecting on previous stages, learners decided what strategy best fit them.

The revised SILL (adapted from Oxford, 1990), the focus group interviews, Vocabulary Level Tests (VLT, Schmitt et al., 2001), TOEIC tests, a questionnaire on Strategying, and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (form M) were used as instruments to collect data.

As a result, more strategies were used by participants, and significant improvements in VLT were observed, although no significant improvement in TOEIC scores was found. More than 80% of the participants agreed that the four-stage process of Strategying was useful, and many of them found their BFSs. A unique interaction between introversion and the use of strategies was identified. Referring to results of the past five years of experiments, the advantages and drawbacks of Strategying will be addressed.

Speakers
NW

Natsumi Wakamoto

Professor, Doshisha Women's College of Liberal Arts
Natsumi Wakamoto is Professor in the Department of English, Doshisha Women’s College of Liberal Arts in Kyoto, Japan, where he teaches applied linguistics and teacher training courses. Through his research on the individual differences of EFL learners, he has been exploring ways to help different types of learners use appropriate strategies to im- prove their English proficiency. He has a B.A. in education from Kyoto University, an M.Ed. in... Read More →


Friday August 14, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

¡Mira mamá! ¡Sin manos!' Can Speech Recognition Tools Be Soundly Applied for L2 Speaking Practice?
Based on a recent language center and departmental implementation (see e.g. Workshop), this paper will give a brief overview over the current research status of the (known "hard task") of speech recognition as a prominent subset of the (recently much more widely discussed) automated Natural Language Processing, compare various engineering implementations that are more or less readily available to the end user (MS-Windows, Google (Chrome/Android), language learning material providers like Auralog), and discuss their possible application in SLA programs for speaking practice in various dictation exercises (including recognition samples from native speakers and language learners) and integration into language learner achievement ePortfolios.

Speakers

Friday August 14, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
William James 105 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

Can the Language Center Still Innovate?
After the arrival of HyperCard in the late 80’s many language centers and teachers began creating their own innovative, interactive multimedia projects for their students to use. Toolbook, Flash, Director, and Revolution/LiveCode provided opportunities to expand beyond one platform and gave greater access to authentic multimedia materials. Online tools such as Quia and Hot Potatoes provided opportunities to customize and create original tutorial materials. Now, however, with the explosion of online tools, apps, applets, publisher content, and mobile technology, how much innovation is still possible? With access to independent internet tools, major learning management systems, and mobile smartphone and tablet technology, the creation of independent content seems no longer useful.

Technology in language teaching has become guided by learning management systems, YouTube videos, and online tools such as VoiceThread, Flipgrid, Educannon and others. What kinds of technology support does the Language Center now offer? Do we train instructors in systems that our institutions have purchased, asking them to conform to something externally determined? Do we now search for the coolest online inexpensive tools and show instructors how to use them? Do we train instructors in the use of pre-packaged tools and ensure that the pedagogy conforms to the tools that are available? How can we still provide opportunities for the pedagogy to drive the technology and encourage creativity so that technology serves the goal of teaching and learning language?

The session aims to provoke a discussion to collectively explore how language centers can maintain a leading role in language teaching and learning through technology. If we no longer provide the content, but rather search for and make available tools to support language learning, what principles could/should guide us, and how will we maintain a role as innovators pushing the envelope?

Speakers
avatar for Dan Soneson

Dan Soneson

University of Minnesota


Friday August 14, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

Best Practices in Computer-assisted Language Learning
The Effect of an Online Translation Scoring System on Language Learning Motivation and Achievement of College Students

EFL learners’ translation proficiency is regarded as one of the language skills which should be required at universities in China. However, because of the great number of students in English classes, there is not enough time for each student to practice translation in class. Therefore, it is of great significance to provide college students with more opportunities and individualized feedback for practicing translation out of class.

An online translation scoring system was developed that enables students to practice translation out of class in Shanghai Jiao Tong University. When students submit their translations exercises online, the system can score the translations instantly and display the scores on the screen.

Two classes of sophomores of non-English majors from Shanghai Jiao Tong University participated the experiment which lasted for one semester. In the first class of the 2014 Spring semester, a pretest of translation was given. One class was randomly assigned as the experimental class and the other as the control group. The students in the experimental class were asked to practice their translation by doing a minimum number of exercises using the system out of class. While the students in the control class were asked to do the same number of translation exercises on paper. The keys to the exercises were not given until all the students finished the exercises. At the end of the semester, a post test of translation as well as a questionnaire were given. The analysis of the data indicated that although the students’ translation achievements were not greatly improved, yet their motivation for doing translation exercises by themselves out of class was tremendously increased and their interest in translation was also aroused, which will benefit their English learning in the long run.

Speakers
YT

YAN TIAN

SHANGHAI JIAO TONG UNIVERSITY


Friday August 14, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

Development of Korean Elementary School Students' Intercultural Competence via Telecollaboration with American Peers
The on-going study is designed to investigate how Korean elementary students develop their intercultural competence (IC) while telecollaborating with American peers. 14 Korean sixth graders, English language learners, have exchanged information with 7 American fifth graders regarding themselves, Christmas message and their school life such as school schedule, school buildings, lunch time, etc. Since the Korean students have limited English skills, they were asked to make a group of 3 students and each group has worked on their topics with group members, using a tablet and a laptop computer. After completing each of topics, they have created either a short video clip or a written note with pictures and posted on a blog site, which is managed privately by only the study researcher and the two school teachers. This telecollaborative learning project started at the end of September, Korean students have met for 2 hours every other week, and they will have the last class at the early of this February

To evaluate the Korean students’ level of IC, Fantini’s IC assessment tool is used; first, his questionnaire was translated into Korean and some technical terminology changed into plain words to make them better understood. After modifying Fantini’s IC tool, Korean elementary school teachers were requested to review each statement and to rewrite it if necessary considering the students’ cognitive ability. Then, 3 sixth graders in the same school, but not participating in the study, were asked to respond to each statement and to report if they had any difficulty in understanding. The finalized assessment tool was given to the participants in the study before they started their telecollaborative learning project. Upon the completion of the telecollaborative project at the end of January, the participants will take the post-test with the same questionaire. The responses from both the pre-test and the post-test will be compared through paired sample t-test to find any development differences of Korean elementary school students’ IC, based on the four components of Fantini’s IC model: knowledge, attitude, skill and awareness.

Speakers
BP

Boonjoo Park

Catholic Unversity of Daegu


Friday August 14, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
CGIS Knafel K354 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

3:00pm

How do I measure up? A Case Study of Beginning Online Language Teachers
Online language learning is becoming increasingly popular with advances in technology that facilitate the acquisition of language in virtual environments (Duensing et al., 2006). Much of the recent literature on online foreign language instruction has focused on the possibilities presented by online technologies but has failed to examine the practical side of how and by whom online language courses are delivered. Several authors have published articles on the skills needed to be a successful online language teacher using empirical approaches (see Comas-Quinn, 2011) and some focus more on theoretical discussions (see Hampel & Stickler, 2005). The current study drew on the existing frameworks in the previous literature to operationalize and measure the participants’ online language teaching skills before and after teaching a class online. These participants were graduate student instructors of Spanish at a large public university (n = 3). This study used a case study approach to data analysis (Duff, 2008) and gathered data through a variety of qualitative instruments (e.g. questionnaires, surveys, assessments, observations, journals, interviews). The findings indicate that participants struggled to reach proficiency in all skill areas except the basic technology skills due mainly to lack of proper training and ongoing support. The implications of this research point to the importance of a robust and well developed training program and ongoing follow-up training and development support from supervisors in order for online language teachers to reach and maintain proficiency of skills. This study serves as one of the few empirical studies conducted in the United States that concretely operationalizes and measures through carefully designed instruments the prescribed online language teaching skills in an effort to gain insights into what contributes to their development and how to sustain their continued growth.

Speakers
RB

Rebecca Berber-McNeill

Arizona State University


Friday August 14, 2015 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

3:35pm

Academic writing as aesthetics applied: creative use of technology to support learning through the development of its visual, kinesthetic and rhythmic dimensions, as well as critical thinking
This study looks at the genre of academic writing as an aesthetic experience. The key research on which it draws comes from the work of Professor V. S. Ramachandran and his eight laws of artistic experience which he proposed as a neurological theory of aesthetic experience (1999). Linking the genre of academic writing to his theory of aesthetic experience makes sense considering that like writing, art is a means of communication. Therefore it is expected that both forms of expression share the laws which artists either consciously or unconsciously deploy to arouse interest in their work, i.e. to optimally communicate with the audience. The emphasis of multisensory experience, rather than rules, takes academic writing beyond the conventional models which see text as an application of generic structural procedures or guidelines for writing. This is a pioneering project conducted collaboratively with Master of Education students, experimenting with different technologies and strategies to improve their own writing. Research methodology and its results are discussed, as well as strategies for experiencing one’s own writing as art with the help of technology.

Speakers

Friday August 14, 2015 3:35pm - 4:00pm
Lamont Forum Room - 3rd Floor 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

3:35pm

Blended Learning of Extensive Graded Reading and Data-driven Learning

Applying usage-based theory of language acquisition (Tomasello, 2003) to extensive graded reading, learners will construct their linguistic knowledge based on the type and token frequency of words and lexical chunks they encounter while reading the graded texts. In order to efficiently and effectively enhance such item-based and bottom-up language learning through extensive graded reading, this paper presents a data-driven learning (DDL) system on the Internet utilizing the Oxford Bookworms (OBW) library corpus consisting of 10 books from levels 1 to 6. The graded OBW corpus will enable learners to choose which level of the OBW corpus is appropriate to their current English levels and like a lexicographer studies language, they can study the language of the OBW text.

Taking synonyms “say”, “speak”, “talk”, and “tell” as examples, detailed description of students procedures of the DDL are shown. While learners were reading the OBW books extensively outside the class, learners “observe” the meanings and the use of the four utterance words in the OBW corpus, formulating a “hypothesis” based on the observation, and “restructure” their perceptions about the four utterance words. In order to examine the educational effects of the extensive reading class incorporating the DDL, a test which made them choose the right word from among the four utterance words was given at the beginning and at the end of the semester. The growth rate of the scores at the end of the semester more than doubled from the beginning of the semester. The result is also examined qualitatively based on their reflective reports submitted at the end of the semester in terms of how their perceptions about the four utterance words changed and how the perception change made them appreciate the stories more deeply when they read the OBW books.

Speakers
KM

Kunitaro Mizuno

Fukuoka Prefectural University


Friday August 14, 2015 3:35pm - 4:00pm
William James B1 33 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA

3:35pm

Does Self-monitoring by Videotaping Student's English Role-play Improve EFL Students' Self-efficacy?
This paper presents the findings of an educational intervention designed to examine the effects of self-monitoring actualized by videotaping students’ English role-play performance in compulsory English classes on the improvement of students’ self-efficacy toward speaking in English. The participants in this study were 70 lower-intermediate second year private university students in Japan who majored in welfare. The participants belonged to four compulsory English classes (class A, B, C, & D) and were divided into a video self-monitoring group (class A & B) and a control group (class C & D). Students attended required English classes once a week in a 90-minute class for fourteen weeks. All of these classes focused on language output especially on speaking, used the same textbook and followed the same curriculum. The educational intervention conducted in those classes includes making a dialog collaborating with other student(s) and performing a role-play using the dialog they made in front of the class, employing self and peer-to-peer evaluation on the performance and its preparation procedure, and keeping reflection journals. The role-play projects were conducted three times during the semester. The video self-monitoring group videotaped their performance with their smart phone and watched their videotaped performance prior to self and peer to peer evaluation on their performance. The control group did not videotape their performance. Other than that, all the classes received the same educational intervention. The data was collected qualitatively by using a questionnaire adapted from Bandura (1990) at the beginning and at the end of the semester to assess the students’ self-efficacy toward speaking in English. Changes in scores: the differences between pre-test and post-test scores, served as the measures of development of students’ self-efficacy toward speaking in English. The data was examined from the perspectives of general tendency and individual differences.

Speakers
JO

Junko Omotedani

Kwansei Gakuin University


Friday August 14, 2015 3:35pm - 4:00pm
Barker 133 (Plimpton) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

3:35pm

Teaching / Learning Technology as a Viable Resource in a Changing and Diverse Academic Environment
Hybrid (or blended) teaching has become the most popular way to integrate teaching/learning technology in language instruction. After an initial interest in all-online instruction a few years ago, experience quickly showed that online teaching worked optimally for self-driven, highly motivated students. The opposite is true, however, for an overwhelmingly larger majority of learners who need more structure and supervision. College students, increasingly regarded as ‘not college prepared,’ now need to be taught what being a student entails in a college environment, and colleges need to accept the new challenge. Stringent admission requirements may not be a good option. Interestingly, and contrary to early concerns in the field, teaching/learning technology has also strengthened a need for a human instructor with whom some regular interaction could be ensured. Attention is now directed toward combining the best of the old and the new ways of doing things in an instructional setting.

At Georgia State University, a research university with a highly diverse population, 10 (about 300 students) out of 40 (1200 students) sections of Spanish 1001 and Spanish 1002 were turned into hybrid sections in Spring 2013 and Fall 2014. In a two semester-long pilot experience whose purpose was to determine whether hybrid courses were viable in a highly diverse setting, hybrid and regular courses were compared and assessed. This presentation will report on the findings by introducing quantitative results (grade and retention rate comparisons) that suggested in Spring 2013 that the experience be repeated in Fall 2014. This presentation will also report on the results of a multifactorial analysis of the experience to claim that hybrid instruction is indeed an effective option in foreign/second language instruction in the changing setting of education today. Ultimately, the use of technology in a hybrid context is a proper response to the challenges of modern education.

Speakers
avatar for Raul Llorente

Raul Llorente

Lecturer-Spanish, Georgia State University
I am a full-time lecturer of Spanish at Georgia State University in Atlanta since 2012. I teach undergraduate courses in Spanish, including elementary, intermediate, and conversational courses, as well as a postgraduate second language pedagogy course. I have a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics in the area of second language acquisition. The title of my doctoral thesis is "Implications of the “Natural Order of Acquisition” Theory in a Classroom... Read More →


Friday August 14, 2015 3:35pm - 4:00pm
Holden Chapel Holden Chapel, Harvard Bus Tunnel, Cambridge, MA

3:35pm

Evaluating the Performance of a Language Lab (Director): Establishing Metrics
Many of us who lead and work in language labs are often perplexed about finding tangible ways to measure our performance. The charter, goals, size, scope and organizational structure of language labs vary and it is challenging to measure their performance based on any one set of metrics. In what ways can the performance of a language lab be measured? I identified a variety of metrics that are directly mapped to the mission and function of my center. In this session, I will discuss some of the measures I use to evaluate the performance of the center I lead.

Speakers
SG

Sangeetha Gopalakrishnan

Wayne State University


Friday August 14, 2015 3:35pm - 4:00pm
Barker 110 (Thompson) 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

3:35pm

A Crowdsourcing Approach to Vocabulary Learning
This presentation will report on a study conducted to examine the use of Memrise, a crowdsourcing spaced repetition program, by college students of Chinese, and its effects on Chinese character learning. The presenter will share the actual experience in using the program in a college-level Chinese language class to experiment a crowdsourcing approach to vocabulary learning. As a special electronic flashcard program built on the crowdsourcing concept, Memrise allows users to create, share and select Mems, i.e. mnemonic units such as animated gifs, images and unique explanations, for their electronic flashcards. This process engages and motivates students, contributes to learner autonomy and personalized learning and results in more effective learning. The presenter will demonstrate the special features of Memrise and discuss important conditions that need to exist in order for the program to be effective. Even though the present study focuses on Chinese character learning, the findings of the study can be applied to any other languages.

Speakers
JX

Jian X. Wu

Southern Connecticut State University


Friday August 14, 2015 3:35pm - 4:00pm
CGIS Knafel K050 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

3:35pm

Do Japanese University Students Want to Be Global? Exploring the Ways and Means
This study explores Japanese university students’ beliefs about learning English and their attitudes toward English speakers and their countries. The relationship between their level of English proficiency and their beliefs is also examined.

The Japanese Ministry of Education, Science, Culture, Sports, and Technology has started educational reforms in English from the elementary level through higher education. The primary intention is to establish an educational environment which corresponds to globalization.

Concerns remain regarding students’ interests and their level of English proficiency. Both of these show the tendency of bipolarization. Although the Ministry is apparently trying to draw people’s attention to English education, how do most university students feel about English, English speakers, and their respective countries? Many university students lose their original desire to study abroad after entering university.

In Japan, so-called newcomers (people who have recently come from overseas countries) have increased since 1990s. Their occupations include students, teachers, researchers, workers, dancers, etc. Many came to settle down in Japan with their families and the non-Japanese population is increasing year by year. Whether they wish or not, Japanese university students will be obliged to work with these newcomers in offices and schools all over Japan, using usually either Japanese or English.

Japan is changing into a multicultural society. At such a transformational moment for Japan, it is necessary to investigate how Japanese university students (expecting leaders) feel about learning English and their attitudes toward English and English speakers because English has become a communication tool. The research questions are as follows:

1. What do many Japanese university students feel about learning English, English speakers, and their respective countries?

2. Do their attitudes change according to the curriculum?

3. Do their attitudes toward English, English speakers, and their respective countries relate to their proficiency scores?

The results appear at the presentation.

Speakers
ST

Sachiko Takahashi

Notre Dame Seishin University


Friday August 14, 2015 3:35pm - 4:00pm
CGIS South S010 (Tsai Auditorium) 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA

4:00pm

4:15pm

FLEAT Closing Plenary: 50 Years and Beyond: Drawing on Our Past to Predict Our Future
This conference-concluding plenary brings audience and panelists together to draw from our past to examine and plan for the future of language learning and technology. Panelists and Moderator were chosen for their range of experience in the field and within the organization, but all of us attending the conference have expertise, ideas and hopes for what is to come. Questions will be distributed in advance for panelists and attendees alike to ponder before the plenary, and using big-screen projected live polling, the audience will participate in the conversation. We hope to capture the discussion in a chapter of IALLT's planned publication "From Language Lab to Language Center and Beyond" which will be edited by panelist Felix Kronenberg. Panel Moderator: LeeAnn Stone

Speakers
JF

Judi Franz

University of California - Irvine
avatar for Felix Kronenberg

Felix Kronenberg

Associate Prof., Modern Languages & Director of the Language Learning Center, Rhodes College


Friday August 14, 2015 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Mallinckrodt B23 (Pfizer Lecture Hall) 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge MA

6:00pm

 
Saturday, August 15
 

8:30am

IALLT Board Meeting
Saturday August 15, 2015 8:30am - 12:00pm
Omni Parker House Hotel 60 School St, Boston, MA 02108

9:00am

Create, Consume, Collaborate: Personalised language learning with iPads
This workshop will explore practical ideas on how iPads can facilitate collaboration and foster creativity through personalised language learning journeys and workflows. We will look at how the multi-modal device can help learners access higher order thinking skills, cater to multiple intelligences and create new ways of working, putting the learning right in the students’ hands. Joe Dale will walk you through how iOS devices can be used for consuming and creating multimedia content drawing on a range of skills as well as issues such as file management, classroom voting and QR codes. He will be sharing some top tips on how to keep up to date with the latest recommended apps for education and troubleshooting any issues you may have along the way. Suggestions of YOUR favourite apps are welcome too.

Programme:

Part 1: 2hrs Promoting listening and speaking, pronunciation and confidence with the iPad
In this session, we shall look at a range of apps for recording and editing audio, combining images with a voiceover and creating engaging animations and narrated slideshows which help to improve listening and speaking skills

Part 2: 60 mins Exploring QR codes for promoting all four skills
In this session we will look at how Quick Responses (QR codes) can transfer website links and text to learner's iPads quickly and easily from an interactive whiteboard or paper worksheet. We will also explore the potential of creating audio QR codes and screencasts.

Part 3: Plenary and close

You will:
- discover how the iPad marks a change in pedagogy by encouraging creativity, personalisation and learner autonomy
- see how a range of apps can promote speaking and listening skills and cater to learning styles producing professional looking resources
- pool ideas about the usefulness of different apps via an online bulletin board

Participants should plan to bring their own iPads if possible, although a limited number should be available to borrow if you do not have one. Information will be sent prior to the workshop with a list of apps that should be downloaded ahead of time.

Speakers

Saturday August 15, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
Lamont 400 (LRC) 11 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA

9:00am

New Approaches to Online Course Design with ANVILL
This workshop will introduce the latest version of ANVILL-LTI (A National Virtual Language Lab), the University of Oregon's free, web-based application focused on speech and the design of highly interactive tasks for listening comprehension and discussion.

ANVILL-LTI aims to give: 1) language students a set of easy-to-use tools for initiating and responding to a variety of language tasks; 2) language teachers a fast and easy way to create and share lesson material, 3) course developers a free and widely supported platform to modify and enhance the core set of tools that ANVILL comes with (media rich lesson designs, private and public asynchronous voiceboards, synchronous chat, media-based quizzes).

More than 2500 K-16 language teachers worldwide now use a version of ANVILL. Our workshop begins with hands-on tasks that illustrate ANVILL’s multifaceted approach to incorporating student speech in lesson design. We then move through a series of case studies and scenarios that guide participants in the creation of tasks appropriate for their own learners. We particularly focus on ANVILL's newest tools for course authoring and delivery on mobile devices. These let students interact and respond to spoken language in a variety of contexts; it then stores those interactions for teachers to review at their convenience. Participants leave the workshop with the requisite information to begin implementing ANVILL at their own institution.

ANVILL 2.0 is now designed for mobile devices as well as desktop computers. It comes in three flavors: 1) as a standalone application that can run on an institution’s own servers, 2) as an LTI object that can be embedded inside an institution’s existing learning management system, or 3) as a cloud-based application hosted at the University of Oregon.

The workshop should be of particular interest to materials developers, language center directors, and those working in online and hybrid teaching situations.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Magoto

Jeff Magoto

Director, Yamada Language Center, University of Oregon
CALL, language centers, and teacher training.


Saturday August 15, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
Lamont B-30 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA

9:00am

Quizlet: My Best Web 2-Point-Oh Friend
Quizlet; My Best Web 2.0 Friend introduces Quizlet.com, to teachers for the first time, as well as opens the eyes of those who already use it to reveal a new, creative and refreshing way to use it in the classroom. See several videos of students using it in the classroom. Learn how it ties into Bloom’s Taxonomy and enhances listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Rather than learning a little about several Web 2.0 sites, learn a lot about one. The session will cover the following:

• Repeat and Recognize
• Oral Mastery
• Written Mastery
• “Learn”
• “Speller”
• “Test”
• Online Proof
• Mass Whiteboard
• Solitaire
• Sentence Relay
• Screen Recording
• Reading Comprehension
• Hot Seat
• Marathon
• “Paper Balls”
• Oral Quizzes
• Oral Exams
• Worksheet Generator
• Creating Folders
• Note Generator
• Finding, creating, combing and editing sets
• "Study/Practice" directions for non-target-language-speaking parents to help at home

Participants will get a free “Plus account” for a year.

Speakers
JT

Joanne Thomas

Holy Innocents' Episcopal School


Saturday August 15, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
Lamont Library - Room 310 11 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138